August 2018 - FITBODYUSA
If you want to make your exercise routine even more effective at burning fat and losing weight, take note of the pre-workout and post-workout foods that help you lose weight in a healthy way.

What You Should Eat before and After Workout To Lose Weight


Even if your goal is to lose weight, experts agree that intense exercise on an empty stomach is not a good idea. Playing sports involves an extra expense of energy for our body. If you don't have enough, you'll probably train for less time and end up with fatigue or starvation (encouraging you to overeat after exercise). This situation is not ideal for achieving the goal of weight loss and may also cause damage to your muscles that may have had to rely on their glycogen stores to maintain activity.

It is also not about overeating by eating more calories than you burn by exercising, because then you simply wouldn't lose a single gram. When choosing what to eat before and after weight loss workout, consider the type of activity you are going to do, its intensity, your own physical needs and also the time between eating the food and getting going.

If you want to know what to eat before and after exercising, you should of course not eat the same thing if you are training within 15 minutes of lunch as if you plan to eat it three hours after lunch. A good balance between carbohydrates, fast and slow absorption, and protein depends largely on the effectiveness of training in terms of weight loss.

What foods help you lose weight before and after exercise?


As a general rule, before training, carbohydrates take centre stage. Your body needs energetic but low-fat foods for exercise. A piece of fruit, for example a banana, a juice, or a snack in the form of a wholemeal toast with jam or yogurt with some oatmeal flakes are three good suggestions of foods that you can eat before training and that you take 20 or 30 minutes before carrying out an intense routine.

If we talk about a longer period of time between food and training, slow absorption carbohydrates come into play, those that will provide energy as the body demands it. A plate of pasta or rice and some high glycemic index fruit, such as melon or watermelon, can be the basis of an ideal menu for someone who plans to practice sports in the following hours. In this case, protein should also be present in the food you eat, especially if your training involves resistance (swimming, running, etc.) or intense muscle work (gym weights).

If you want to lose weight, include lean meats or fish in your meal and if you prefer to have just one snack, try a brown rice cake, on which you can put some slices of turkey breast or a portion of tortilla (French).

What to eat after workout to avoid weight gain?

After training hard, you'll want to know what foods to eat after training so you don't get fat, and which are recommended to keep your body burning calories while recovering from the effort. The first step is to achieve correct hydration so that the body replenishes the water and lost electrolytes. For some sportsmen and women, there is nothing better than a good glass of milk 15 - 20 minutes after the practice of their activity (you can also choose isotonic drinks). If you also notice that you need to "recharge" energy, always use "slow" carbohydrates.

The cereal bars give excellent results in order not to get fat after exercising. After a reasonable amount of time, it's time to provide the protein needed for muscle recovery and also the minerals, vitamins and fiber your body needs: salads, boiled vegetables, fish rich in omega-3s and lean meats can be ideal for a dinner around the gym. Watch what you eat before and after training if you want to lose weight, because it's important.

RELATED: How to Make a High Protein Breakfast

What You Should Eat before and After Workout To Lose Weight
 

What You Should Eat before and After Workout To Lose Weight




Nutrition is still full of myths. But sports training is not an understatement either. So you can imagine what happens when we unite both spheres and talk about sports nutrition: a jumble of beliefs and legends.

Meal Schedule, Bodybuilding and Sports Performance


A few weeks ago, the International Society of Sports Nutrition published its position on a popular topic of sports nutrition, the influence on sports performance and muscle development of the timing and composition of meals and their synchronization with exercise (nutrient timing). The document is entitled "International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing (2017)" and for those who prefer a shortened version, these are its conclusions translated into Spanish:

1. Endogenous glycogen reserves are maximized by following a high-carbohydrate diet (8-12 g of carbohydrate per kg body weight per day); these reserves are depleted primarily by high exercise volume.

  • If rapid glycogen recharge (<4 hours) is required, the following strategies should be considered:
  • Carbohydrate intake (1.2 g / kg / h) with preference for sources with high glycaemic index (> 70)
  • Adding caffeine (3-8 mg/kg)
  • Combine carbohydrates (0.8 g / kg / h) with protein (0.2-0.4 g / kg / h).

3. Prolonged (> 60 min) high intensity (> 70% VO2max) exercise challenges energy supply and fluid regulation, so carbohydrates should be consumed at a rate of ~ 30-60 g of carbohydrate / h at 6-8% (180-360 ml) every 10-15 min throughout the exercise, particularly in those exercise sessions that go beyond 70 min. When carbohydrate supply is inadequate, the addition of protein can help increase performance, improve muscle damage, promote euglycemia and facilitate glycogen re-synthesis.

4. Carbohydrate intake throughout strength exercise (e.g., 3-6 series of 8-12 maximum repetitions using multiple exercises targeting all major muscle groups) has been shown to promote euglycemia and increase glycogen stores. Consuming carbohydrates alone or in combination with protein during strength exercise increases muscle glycogen stores, improves muscle damage and facilitates greater training adaptations, both short and long term.

5. Achieving total daily protein intake should be considered important, preferably with evenly spaced feeding (approximately every 3-4 hours during the day), .

6.Ingestion of essential amino acids (EAA, approximately 10 g), either in free form or as part of a protein bolus of approximately 20-40 g, has been shown to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS).

7. Pre- and post-exercise nutritional interventions (carbohydrates + protein or protein alone) can work as an effective strategy to support increased strength and improved body composition. However, the size and timing of a preexercise meal can affect the need for protein feeding after exercise.

8. Post-exercise (up to 2 hours after completion) intake of high-quality protein sources stimulates muscle protein synthesis (MPS).

9. In a scenario without exercise, changing the frequency of meals has shown little impact on weight loss and body composition, and there is some evidence that the frequency of meals can favorably improve appetite and satiety. More research is needed to determine the influence of combining an exercise programme with changes in meal frequency on weight loss and body composition; preliminary research indicates potential benefit

10. Intake of a 20-40 g protein dose (0.25-0.40 g/kg body mass/dose) from a high-quality source every three to four hours appears to affect the rate of muscle protein synthesis more favourably than other dietary patterns and is associated with better body composition and performance results.

11. Consuming casein (~ 30-40 g) before sleep can increase muscle synthesis and metabolic rate throughout the night without influencing lipolysis.

The document is freely accessible, so if you are interested in the subject, I encourage you to read it in its entirety.

RELATED: Muscle Hypertrophy vs Strength - Yes, There is a Difference

On the other hand, I would remind you that you do not need to spend money on supplements, shakes and pills to comply with these recommendations, you can also follow them (I would say even healthier) by simply planning your diet properly.

In addition, these are conclusions on which experts have found evidence of some strength, so I would forget any other statements or advice we may have heard regarding meal times, sports performance and bodybuilding. They probably don't have enough evidence behind it.

Meal Schedule, Muscle Development and Sports Performance