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Showing posts with label health. Show all posts
Showing posts with label health. Show all posts
When designing a weight loss diet, very fatty (and therefore calorie) foods are usually on the unwanted list or at least on the "eat in great moderation" list. After all, a lot of fat means a lot of calories. But we have already seen in several articles that this reasoning is not always correct. For example, we saw that the studies have not been able to find a correlation between nuts and overweight, since there are other factors in their composition that end up compensating in a favorable way for their energy intake.

Avocado, An Exceptional Food That Does Not Make You Fat


Avocado is another of these atypical foods. In several ways. First of all because it is one of the few fruits in whose nutritional composition the main macronutrient is fat, instead of the usual carbohydrates, which gives it a high energy density of almost 700 kJ (160 kilocalories) per hundred grams. Most of it is monounsaturated fat, so its effect on health is beyond suspicion and the exceptional amount of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and fibre it also provides is well known. But the truth is that, despite the praise that comes with it, it is also often recommended to eat in moderation in weight loss processes, because of the commented calories that accompany it.

Since to date there was not much meaningful evidence on its relationship to obesity, little could be added to this, but fortunately, that evidence is beginning to emerge. The study "Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001--2008" has just been published. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) has analysed the relationship between various indicators and this tasty fruit by observing more than 17,000 people over eight years.

With all the precautions that must be taken in a single observational study, the results are clearly positive. They indicate that people who eat more avocado have a better diet, more nutrients, less risk of metabolic syndrome and less weight. Yes, less weight, despite all its calories.

Regarding possible intervention trials, the only one I have found is "A randomized 3×3 crossover study to evaluate the effect of Hass avocado intake on post-ingestive satiety, glucose and insulin levels, and subsequent energy intake in overweight adults" (2013), a small study in which the effect of adding half an avocado to the diet was analysed. The researchers found that their intake increased satisfaction and satiety and reduced the insulinemic response after mealtime. In addition, the final calorie balance was not negatively affected, i.e. no more calories were ingested when eating ad-libitum.

So you know, for the moment you can incorporate it into your meals without fear. If you spend a little time searching for recipes online, you'll be amazed at how many delicious ways you can take them.

RELATED: 5 Healthy Salad Recipes for Fat Loss and Muscle-Building

Avocado, An Exceptional Food That Does Not Make You Fat

The flu is spreading throughout Europe and we all hope to be spared. For all those who have already done it or want to prevent it, here are a few smoothie recipes with a bunch of good, strengthening ingredients. Cheers!

Super Smoothies For The Immune System


Smoothies are not only healthy, they are also super tasty, quite easy to mix yourself and on top of that they are visually quite something. Here are our 3 favorite recipes and a few tips on how to jump on this healthy super trend.


Green Smoothie


Green Power

2x handful of fresh spinach
1x approx. 10cm of fresh cucumber in small cubes
1x fresh green, juicy apple in narrow slices
1x small mint branch
(optional) 4x ice cubes, if your machine can mix them



Strengthening Detox-Smoothie


Strengthening Detox-Smoothie

1x peel juicy orange and use it completely (do not squeeze)
½ Juice lemon
½ Banana
1x cup of light green tea (should not have pulled longer than 3 minutes)
100ml almond milk



Summery Stimulant Smoothie


Summery Stimulant Smoothie

1x handful of blueberries
4x medium strawberries
2x handful of watermelon cubes
½ Mango


And here are a few quick tips:

A visit to the weekly market just before the stands are dismantled can not only be spontaneous inspiration for the next smoothie, but also saves your wallet.

If you suddenly land at home with 4 bunches of bananas, 5 avocado and 3 boxes of blueberries (from experience: Yes, it happens), then now comes the super trick: wash fruit, if necessary dice it and divide it into glass-compatible, tasty combined portions. These portions can then be individually frozen and defrosted if necessary. For example, you can save time in the morning, ensure a healthy, tasty breakfast, while the freezing condition makes the smoothie even creamier.

RELATED: Healthy Smoothies for Weight Loss


So and now: off to the market and then merry pureeing. Have fun!

Super Smoothies For The Immune System

The term yoga can be translated as "integration", "union" or "connection". This primarily refers to the harmony between body and mind. Yoga has become a widely accepted means to compensate for permanent stress in everyday life, but this is exactly where the biggest problem lies.

Back To The Mat - More Yoga For More Variety


THE TERM YOGA...

...can be translated as "integration", "union" or "connection". This primarily refers to the harmony between body and mind. Yoga has become a widely accepted means to compensate for permanent stress in everyday life, but this is exactly where the biggest problem lies. The stress tempts to neglect the regular yoga exercises. This article should therefore help to hold on to the most sporty way of relaxation and to think more often only about ourselves and our well-being.

THE THING WITH MOTIVATION

Even the most motivated people are sometimes thrown off course. This is not unusual, the present holds its challenges and trials for all of us - both physically and mentally. Job, private life and leisure activities, all of which have to be integrated into everyday life, are very challenging for us.

In addition there are strokes of fate, relationship problems, psychologically strong strains, which we do not choose and which come over us. In addition, we ourselves are not immune to health hazards - this can also quickly become a problem for us. In times of such stress, we humans tend to reduce those parts of our lives that we regard as supposedly optional, i.e. that we do not consider absolutely necessary. However, we like to neglect the fact that it is precisely these aspects of our lives that make it worth living in the first place.

Our inner center can quickly be disturbed when we are struck by such blows. We can be very well-balanced people, and yet a really bad time can change everything. Therefore it is important to find the motivation for the things we love, because they can help us on our way back to balance.

YOGA - HOW TO GET YOUR MOTIVATION BACK TO YOU


HOW TO GET YOUR MOTIVATION BACK TO YOU

Well, how are we supposed to be motivated again? How are we supposed to find the time, peace and inspiration for regular practice again? First of all, we have to analyse exactly what ultimately caused yoga to stop motivating us on its own, as it should be. However, the reasons can also be to be found in yoga itself, instead of in the difficulties that lurk in the environment.

A few examples: The own ego becomes too big and the progress in yoga is too small and too slow for the ego. The frustration that the supposedly too little progress brings, one becomes impatient. But of course this is an absurd attitude, because yoga is not a competitive sport and certainly not an ego show. It should serve our well-being and our self-confidence (in the true sense of the word) and not our need to beat other people or to be better than them - we should refrain from this thought in principle.

Especially beginners suffer from impatience. They want to master advanced exercises as quickly as possible - but all this takes time and patience. If you don't bring them up, you can easily get frustrated. So - learning patience, over and over again on the mat, then perfecting the beginner exercises piece by piece and only approaching them after the advanced movements - this is the best method to stay on the mat for a long time. It is therefore best to consider whether the exercises you choose always correspond to your own progress. If this is not the case, it is also perfectly legitimate to shift down a gear.

YOGA - TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE


TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE

But yoga can only contribute in part to taking one's life back into one's own hands. Instead, self-reflective measures are at least as necessary. We should look at the partial aspects of our lives both individually and holistically in order to get back on track. But how can this be done, holistically and individually? Well, it's simple. Only when we analyse the different parts of our life, such as work, our private life, our spiritual side and our relationship life, can we discover what may have gone wrong so far - because something must have thrown us off balance.

Holistic means taking into account the interactions between the different areas of life. Because nothing just happens outside the context. Working life, for example, always has an impact on our private lives - our possibilities of enjoying our love life or practicing yoga. However, it is recommended that you start with an individual view and then go to the overall view.

And afterwards one must by no means regard oneself as a victim of processes or simply accept one's own situation - because with this way of dealing with things, one may not only quickly lose the desire to practice yoga, but also the desire to live. The first step towards improvement is usually the will to change - even if this is not always so easy to achieve. But if even the initiative is not there to take a different direction, life will in no way move in the right direction, that much is clear.

To take your life into your own hands means to develop acceptance for what is not changeable and to change what you actually have influence on.

Of course, phrases like "anyone can make all their dreams come true" are nonsense. For in reality our life is determined not only by what we do and want, but also by numerous other determinants. Nevertheless: May all these determinants with their definitions of our existence come down on us, our own attitude to existence should be as positive as possible. If this is not the case, we nail ourselves and become practically immobilized.

YOGA - ALMOST AS OLD AS THE MESCNHHEIT

But why should yoga be the right choice to contribute to life's happiness? Maybe it was the right thing to stop with the old tradition? Well, we should stop here and think about why we started yoga at all. What are the reasons that inspire you to start? The practice of yoga exercises has very positive health effects, and no one will deny that people's physical health is closely related to their mental state and can have extremely beneficial effects on it.

In addition, it is not for nothing that yoga is such an old method to bring body and mind in harmony. Instead, it is an instrument that has proven itself over thousands of years and offers proven and reliable services. Incidentally, this applies to the presence of people living in the West to a greater extent. Because in our time, existence itself is often so stressful that an oasis of peace and concentration can only work wonders for oneself.

Just as we have to analyze holistically what is no longer running smoothly in our lives, there is hardly a better way to get it back into line than yoga. But why is that at all?

YOGA - POSITIVE CHARACTERISTICS


POSITIVE CHARACTERISTICS

Now we should focus on explaining a little less generally and more concretely what benefits the yoga exercises can bring us. Well, first, it serves some health purposes. All yoga exercises are based on stretching, relaxing and concentrating on breathing. This process increases blood circulation in the body. The slow, controlled movement, relaxation and breathing does not stress the heart, but strengthens it and ensures an improved supply of oxygen throughout the body. Since we almost never concentrate exclusively on our breathing in everyday life, this is a welcome change and offers us the opportunity to consciously perceive it.

Speaking of consciousness - stress is now so deeply rooted in people's everyday lives that it is hardly noticeable any more, it is always present. Nevertheless, one should not come to terms with the feeling of stress - after all, the damaging effects on health are well known. Yoga may not work wonders here, but it can make a contribution, because it stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system - an important part of the vegetative nervous system. This is so important because it can send out relaxation impulses, which in turn should have extremely positive characteristics for your well-being. This is more than just working against stress symptoms, because prevention in this case is much better for health than aftercare.

Apart from all the stress, which naturally has an after-effect on our health, back damage should not be underestimated. Even if they appear as harmless wounds in everyday office life, they can cause more serious problems in the long run - until you can hardly walk. Here, too, yoga can help. By the way, these can also be a consequence of the stress I have just mentioned.

The best thing about yoga, at least in terms of health, is definitely that it helps to regulate the hormonal balance, which is so important for men and women alike.

But yoga is also a good choice for our spiritual side. Because yoga is more than just a lifestyle thing, yoga is an attitude. And that's why yoga is especially recommendable. Meanwhile more and more people are longing to occasionally leave the material world - but many do not feel able to take this step permanently. Therefore, asanas can help to promote the view of one's own life with an improved self-perception. After all, burnout can be a consequence, for example, if stress is not treated with the necessary seriousness, but is constantly reduced.

YOGA - HOW TO FIND YOUR WAY BACK TO THE MAT


HOW TO FIND YOUR WAY BACK TO THE MAT

But now the question is: How do you find your way back to the yoga mat? Well, it's simple. Firstly, we must be aware of all the advantages that we have already mentioned. Secondly, it is important to keep in mind that yoga can be the antithesis to our daily worries and thus a refuge in stormy times. What alternative is there? Neither the television, the Internet nor shopping can offer such a comprehensive and healing experience.

RELATED: How Yoga Helps With Weight Loss


MIX IT UP!

Maybe you have always practiced the same yoga styles and exercises and therefore the practice has become boring. A little variety can't hurt. So let us first dedicate ourselves to the different yoga styles that exist. Well, there are several additional interpretation possibilities for each yoga style, but it is clear that different styles also have different focal points, which can be more or less suitable for the individual depending on their own orientations and focal points.

While Kundalini Yoga, for example, focuses on the spiritual and spiritual, Ashtanga and power yoga are particularly physically intensive. For beginners it is certainly recommended to start with Hatha- or Vinyasa-Yoga, which both have relatively many variations and concentrate on slow movements, so that both are easy to learn.

Yoga - Other Workouts


OTHER WORKOUTS TO RESUME

Before you find your way back to yoga, you sometimes have to take detours. This means switching to other sports, for example. Many may prefer to go outside in the summer. If you can't get ahead with certain asanas, you can train your condition or certain muscles more specifically through other disciplines, for example.

Various points can help to make it easier to get started here as well. A positive attitude towards our own body, playing sports together with friends or exciting trend disciplines make it easier for us to become active in other ways. No matter whether you are inline skating in the park, jogging or trying out other sports such as trampolining or slacklining. All of them can make you feel better about your body and thus arouse your desire for yoga practices again.

Swimming, for example, is a joint-gentle sport particularly suitable for people with back problems, while working with free weights is not recommended for people with such injuries. If one already pauses with the Yoga exercises, one can try all kinds of different kinds of sport once and look in this way over the edge of plate - because the taking off of borders is actually taken a thought, which also arises from the Yoga.

Often it makes sense to combine yoga with other disciplines anyway, for example in order to power oneself to the full alongside the asanas.

EXCURSION: DOSHAS AND ITS EFFECT

The Doshas are extremely important aryuvedic provisions for the constitution of humans. They regulate both physical and mental constitutional conditions and should therefore not be completely ignored. There are three doshas, some of which attribute very different attributes to humans.

It is remarkable that the doshas are even described so precisely that peculiarities of the body structure such as size, face shape, eye shape, teeth, weight, hair, visibility of the veins and other specifications can be named. But that's not all. The doshas even determine what weather conditions people prefer and how they eat. But even with these very exact things is not over yet, because up to the characteristics like courage, how faithful a person is and other really intimate details Doshas can give information. To diagnose them, aryuvedic doctors make a very careful anamnesis to ensure that they are actually correct.

LIVING CONSCIOUSLY - EXPERIENCING A TIME OUT

Sometimes there are times when the best workouts and yoga exercises don't help anymore. There are times when everyday life literally flattens you out and the work-life balance gets completely out of control. So we need some time out. And time-out does not necessarily have to be understood as a simple time-out from work. Time out can mean getting out of your city, out of your circle of friends and far away from anything that causes stress.

Healing also means living carefully, even if it can sometimes be boring. How about a break far away from home, in a different time zone? There you can lead a life as it is hardly conceivable at home. Only pay attention to your own health, nutrition and nature. Meet people who have also decided to take a break and want to escape the promises of Western life.


But even if you don't need this colossal outbreak, targeted time out at home can be quite useful. These never happen on their own, because even on weekends there is always something to do? Only because you allow it yourself. So you have to leave a weekend free in advance - and also not allow any appointments. This is the only way to keep it free and ensure that there is time for yourself. Then off to the mat, to the sauna and to enjoy. No matter how time is spent, time-out also means mobile phone off and deliberately not taking advantage of some amenities, not spending time on the Internet and of course not answering e-mails. This is the only way to actually take a break from the blessings that modern life brings, but which can also quickly become a curse.

Koh Samui Yoga


INSPIRATION WANTED: HERE YOU CAN FIND IT

But without question, as already indicated, it makes much more sense to take flight and look for another place to find one's own center. But of course you should choose a suitable place - for example Koh Samui in Thailand or Sri Lanka. Apart from beautiful beaches, there are also some yoga retreats that are highly recommended and guarantee that one is not too distracted by worldly influences. Otherwise, of course, remote areas that are less developed for tourism are particularly suitable. Bali is preferred by many travelers, but of course this is also a matter of taste. The Dutch Caribbean attracts other people looking for meaning - a good research before departure is certainly a good investment of time to meet one's own needs.

RELATED: Yoga For Weight Loss

Back To The Mat - More Yoga For More Variety

Losing weight quickly and without compromising our health is easier than we thought. There is no need for strange remedies, or intense sessions in the gym or even less to eat less than what our body needs.

7 Simple Tips for Losing Weight in a Very Healthy Way


Losing weight means, above all, changing habits. It may surprise us, but our lifestyles and eating habits are the result of a kind of culture and even education that we are not always aware of.

Also, to realize these aspects and to dare to change them successfully requires a will power that, in principle, not all of us have.

There are times when restricting sugar consumption requires something as simple as stopping buying it. Doing so and fulfilling it also requires that we have the support of our family.

Another aspect that we should integrate into our thinking patterns is that a diet should not be "temporary".

To maintain our ideal weight, the most positive thing to do is to integrate a healthy way of eating into our daily lives, and not in specific periods when we accumulate a few pounds too much.

Eating well is an obligation, not a temporary option.

Here are 7 tips on how to lose weight quickly, but at the same time, healthy and recommended.

1. Medical examination


To lose weight in good health, you must first undergo a medical check-up.

Sometimes, having gained a few extra pounds can be due to very specific diseases, such as hypothyroidism.

  • When it comes to starting any diet, it is a priority for our doctors to inform us about such basic indicators as our cholesterol and blood sugar levels, the parameters of our blood pressure, etc.
  • To lose weight quickly we're going to have to do sports. In order to avoid unnecessary risks it is advisable to rule out heart problems or even simple anemias that will make us feel more tired than usual.

So don't hesitate: have a simple check-up and, when you have your doctor's approval, start with the advice below.

2. A glass of warm water and lemon as soon as you get up


We know that this simple advice is already known to you. What's more, it's quite possible that you already apply it in your daily life.

  • Either way, starting the day off with a glass of warm lemon and lemon water on an empty stomach is a great way to cleanse toxins, take care of your liver, regulate constipation and prepare your body for healthy eating.
  • If you think that the juice of a whole lemon is too intense for you, don't hesitate to reduce the amount according to your own tolerance.
This remedy is always very healthy.

3. 1 minute of exercise before breakfast to lose weight quickly


Once we have had that glass of warm lemon water we will begin a simple aerobic exercise routine.

  • It is a great time to move your body and encourage fat loss.
  • Our insulin level is a little lower than normal, so the energy we use to exercise will come directly from our stored fat stores.
  • Just do a 10-minute walk and vary the type of exercise you do every day: push-ups, squats, dancing or even yoga, whatever you prefer.

4. Oatmeal at your breakfast


Oats are one of the best foods to start your day with. It is important that we never skip breakfast, and it is essential that this first meal of the day be varied and balanced.

  • To lose weight quickly, the last thing we need to do is skip meals.
    In that case, what we would achieve would be a much slower metabolism, dangerously low blood sugars and arriving at the main meal of the day too hungry.
  • However, something as simple as preparing a good bowl of oatmeal will ensure that we get the perfect supply of fibre and minerals (such as iron, sodium, zinc, magnesium, potassium or folic acid).
Also, thanks to the omega 6 fatty acids or linoleic acid we manage to regulate cholesterol.

RELATED: 4 Healthy Breakfast Recipes for Weight Loss

5. Eat natural foods and completely restrict processed foods


This advice is, without a doubt, the one that is going to cost us the most to carry out. It will be because it involves the following:

  • We should always eat fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Avoid all types of sweets, pastries, salt, refined flours, pickles or snacks.
  • We must replace bread made from refined flour with whole grain bread.
  • Pasta, like rice, must be whole grain.
  • Restrict sauces such as mayonnaise, ketchup, cheese spreads, etc.
  • Forget about carbonated drinks, as well as packaged juices: consume only natural beverages.

6. Exercise divided into two half-hour sessions


To lose weight quickly, we must exercise. However, rather than tiring ourselves out in a one-hour session, it is best to spread out our exercise table at different times of the day:

  • As soon as we adjourn a 10-minute session.
  • At noon we will establish a 20 minute exercise routine (if they are of high intensity the effect will be healthier).
  • In the afternoon, and thus avoiding the central hours of the sun, it would be ideal for you to go for a walk or a run. Half an hour is enough.

7. Beware, you need to sleep more than 6 hours each night


More than one may be surprised by this, but getting less than 6 hours of regular sleep will make you overweight and increase your risk of diabetes.

  • If this is your case, if you suffer from chronic insomnia, consult your doctor about a strategy to obtain a deep and restorative sleep.
Sleeping between 7 and 8 hours will cause your body to carry out the basic functions of purification to take care of your metabolism and thus promote faster weight loss.

Encourage yourself to put into practice the advice given here: sometimes it is enough to live a healthy life to lose those extra pounds.

7 Simple Tips for Losing Weight in a Very Healthy Way

WALKING VERSUS RUNNING


Wondering what is the difference?

Walking Versus Running - What is The Difference


There is a huge difference between walking and running. Muscle function involved in walking is quite a few and is limited while in running almost every muscle is involved, that is why running helps to lose more fat and that too at a rapid rate than walking. The more you move your body, the more active you become and to can get rid of the laziness that ties you in a cobweb and do not let you work and perform more efficiently.

Walking can be good for people who hate running or cannot run due to health issues, but if you can and if you are looking to lose weight and get fit you should definitely go for running without giving it a second thought. Walking is good as you are trying to make your body active at an initial stage. When you are just getting started and do not want to put a lot of pressure on your body then you can walk for a few days, after that you can start running as if you right away step into running that you might feel exhausted and will perhaps quit even walking let alone running.

What burns more calories?

Running will for sure burn more calories because it consumes more muscle strength and energy of your body than walking. You can burn almost 300% more calories while running than while walking. More muscle power is involved in running than walking.

By walking you can burn anywhere between 70-110 calories per mile (1.6 km) depending on your weight. If you are 55 kg then you will burn almost 70 calories and if you are around 83 kg then you will burn about 110 calories. (Note one kg weight in pounds will be 2.2 times of kg, example 10 kg =22 pounds)

RELATED: How To Lose Weight Naturally With High Intensity Running 

While running, you burn 300% more calories, but I would suggest that you can twice the figure above for the calories burnt while running as there are a lot of factors that you need to consider, like the distance covered your weight and other factors.

Walking Versus Running - What is The Difference?

First let’s define exactly what we mean by heart-healthy recipes and how this collection is different from other recipes you may have or have seen. Heart-healthy diets are aimed at preventing or reducing a number of risk factors that can lead to heart attacks and heart disease. Among the more important ones are coronary artery disease, high cholesterol and high blood pressure.
The American Heart Association lists seven key items for maintaining cardiovascular health. They are:

  • Don’t smoke
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Engage in regular physical activity
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Manage blood pressure
  • Take charge of cholesterol
  • Keep blood sugar, or glucose, at healthy levels.

35 Easy Heart Healthy Recipes


You can easily see that while they list diet as a separate factor, what you eat affects everything on the list except smoking and exercise. If you start digging into the details of dietary recommendations for staying a healthy weight, maintaining a healthy blood pressure and cholesterol level, and managing blood sugar levels you immediately find that the same recommendations are key to many or all of them. Common themes at such diverse web sites as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the American Heart Association, the Mayo Clinic and WebMD include:

  • Limit the amount of unhealthy fats such as saturated fats and trans fats that you eat
  • Choose lean sources of protein
  • Eat more whole grains
  • East more fruits and vegetables
  • Limit your sodium intake
  • Limit your cholesterol intake.

Why Is Heart-Healthy Cooking Important?


According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States among both men and women. A few statistics from their website show:

  • In 2008, over 616,000 people died of heart disease, almost 25% of deaths in the United States.
  • In that same year, 405,309 people died from coronary heart disease.
  • Every year about 785,000 Americans have a first coronary attack. Another 470,000 who have already had one or more coronary attacks have another attack.
  • In 2010, coronary heart disease alone was projected to cost the United States $108.9 billion. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.
  • More than 27 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with heart disease.

Clearly heart health is a major problem. Statistics in other parts of the world vary, but in many countries heart disease is also the number one cause of death.

35 Easy Heart Healthy Recipes:


1. Vegetable Omelet

Vegetable Omelet


This can be either a breakfast or the main part of an evening meal.

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
2 ounces (55 g) mushrooms, sliced
1/4 cup (40 g) onion, diced
1/4 cup (37 g) green bell peppers, diced
1/4 cup (28 g) zucchini, sliced
1/2 cup (90 g) tomato, diced
4 eggs
2 tablespoons (30 g) fat-free sour cream
2 tablespoons (30 ml) water
2 ounces (55 g) Swiss cheese, shredded

Add olive oil to a large skillet and sauté mushrooms, onion, green bell pepper, zucchini, and tomato until soft, adding tomato last. Whisk together eggs, sour cream, and water until fluffy. Coat an omelet pan or skillet with nonstick vegetable spray and place over medium-high heat. Pour egg mixture into pan. Lift the edges as it cooks to allow uncooked egg to run underneath. When eggs are nearly set, cover half the eggs with the cheese and sautéed vegetables and fold the other half over. Continue cooking until eggs are completely set.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 263 calories (46% from fat, 41% from protein, 13% from carbohydrate); 25 g protein; 13 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 6 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 8 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 386 mg phosphorus; 369 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 309 mg sodium; 246 mg potassium; 962 IU vitamin A; 6 mg ATE vitamin E; 25 mg vitamin C; 395 mg cholesterol; 259 g water


2. Cinnamon Apple Omelet

Cinnamon Apple Omelet


A little different version of an omelet. I remember years ago there were often recipes for omelets with jelly or other sweet fillings, but you don’t see them much any more. This one makes me think they are still a good idea.

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, divided
1 apple, peeled and sliced thin
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon (15 g) brown sugar
3 eggs
1 tablespoon cream
1 tablespoon sour cream

Melt 2 teaspoons butter in egg pan. Add apple, cinnamon, and brown sugar. Sauté until tender. Set aside. Whip eggs and cream until fluffy; set aside. Clean egg pan. Melt remaining butter, pour in egg mixture. Cook as you would for an omelet. When eggs are ready to flip, turn them, then add to the center of the eggs the sour cream and on top of that the apple mixture. Fold it onto a plate.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 129 g water; 252 calories (57% from fat, 17% from protein, 25% from carb); 11 g protein; 16 g total fat; 8 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 16 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 14 g sugar; 181 mg phosphorus; 73 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 126 mg sodium; 211 mg potassium; 695 IU vitamin A; 187 mg vitamin E; 3 mg vitamin C; 379 mg cholesterol


RELATED: 4 Healthy Breakfast Recipes for Weight Loss


3. Spinach Pie

Spinach Pie


A great breakfast idea, but also a great side dish to go with chicken, turkey, or beef.

10 ounces (280 g) frozen spinach
6 eggs, stirred
2 cups (450 g) cottage cheese
1/4 cup (55 g) unsalted butter, melted
6 tablespoons (48 g) flour
10 ounces (283 g) Cheddar cheese, cut into cubes

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, gas mark 4). Cook spinach according to package directions; drain thoroughly and squeeze dry. Mix all ingredients together in a 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33-cm) pan. Bake for 1 hour.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 143 g water; 423 calories (62% from fat, 28% from protein, 10% from carb); 30 g protein; 29 g total fat; 17 g saturated fat; 9 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 10 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 433 mg phosphorus; 462 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 425 mg sodium; 290 mg potassium; 6696 IU vitamin A; 268 mg vitamin E; 1 mg vitamin C; 310 mg cholesterol


4. Grilled Marinated Chicken Breasts

Grilled Marinated Chicken Breasts


These thin grilled chicken breasts make great sandwiches. They are also good sliced on top of a salad or stirred into a pasta salad.

1/4 cup (60 ml) olive oil
1/4 cup (60 ml) red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) minced garlic
1 teaspoon (3 g) onion powder
1 1/2 teaspoons (1 g) Italian seasoning
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried thyme
2 boneless chicken breasts

Combine all ingredients except chicken in a resealable plastic bag and mix well. Slice breasts in half crosswise, making two thin fillets from each. Add the chicken to the bag, seal, and marinate for at least 2 hours, turning occasionally. Remove chicken from marinade and grill over medium heat until done, turning once.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 165 calories (77% from fat, 20% from protein, 2% from carbohydrate); 8 g protein; 14 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 10 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 1 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 74 mg phosphorus; 16 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 25 mg sodium; 110 mg potassium; 38 IU vitamin A; 2 mg ATE vitamin E; 1 mg vitamin C; 21 mg cholesterol; 41 g water

5. Lemon Thyme Chicken

Lemon and honey add a sort of sweet and sour flavor to these grilled chicken breasts.

1/4 cup honey
1 tablespoon lemon peel, grated
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
4 boneless skinless chicken breasts

Heat grill to medium heat. Combine honey, lemon peel, lemon juice, thyme, and pepper. Grill chicken until no longer pink in the center, about 15–20 minutes. Brush with sauce during the last 10 minutes.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 145 calories (6% from fat, 45% from protein, 50% from carb); 17 g protein ; 1 g total fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 18 g carb; 0 g fiber; 18 g sugar; 141 mg phosphorus; 14 mg calcium; 47 mg sodium; 202 mg potassium; 21 IU vitamin A; 4 mg ATE vitamin E; 5 mg vitamin C; 41 mg cholesterol


6. Beef Barley Skillet

A tasty and healthy family meal that cooks in one pan.

3/4 pound (338 g) ground beef
1/2 cup (80 g) chopped onion
1/4 cup (38 g) chopped green bell pepper
1/4 cup (25 g) chopped celery
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 cups (480 g) no-salt-added canned tomatoes, broken up
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) water
3/4 cup (150 g) pearl barley

Sauté meat, onion, green pepper, and celery in nonstick fry pan. Drain off excess fat; stir in remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer; cover and cook about 1 hour.

Yield: 3 servings

Per serving: 389 g water; 477 calories (21% from fat, 31% from protein, 48% from carb); 29 g protein; 9 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 45 g carbohydrate; 10 g fiber; 7 g sugar; 326 mg phosphorus; 90 mg calcium; 6 mg iron; 129 mg sodium; 932 mg potassium; 292 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 30 mg vitamin C; 78 mg cholesterol


7. Brisket of Beef with Beans

Kind of like baked beans with the addition of the beef. The cooking liquid gives the beef a nice flavor, and the beans go well with it.

1 pound (455 g) navy beans
2 pound (900 g) beef brisket
2 slices bacon
1/2 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
2 cups (475 ml) water
1/4 cup (60 ml) maple syrup
1/2 cup (115 g) packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

Soak beans in water overnight. Drain the beans. Brown the fat side of the brisket in a Dutch oven or heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and brown the other side. Add the pepper, water, and beans. Reduce heat to medium and cook, covered, for 2 hours or until the beef and beans are tender, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Remove the beef and keep warm. Add the maple syrup, brown sugar, and mustard to the beans. Mix thoroughly, and simmer over medium heat for another 10 minutes. Slice the brisket thinly and serve with the beans.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 221 g water; 644 calories (49% from fat, 22% from protein, 29% from carb); 35 g protein; 35 g total fat; 14 g saturated fat; 15 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 47 g carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 26 g sugar; 379 mg phosphorus; 103 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 165 mg sodium; 829 mg potassium; 2 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 125 mg cholesterol

Tip: The beef also makes great sandwiches.


RELATED: 1200 Calorie Diet - A Comprehensive Guide With Yummy Meal Plans


8. Grilled Pork Chops

A quick and easy grill recipe for a summer evening. You could make a little extra of the marinade and put it on zucchini slices to grill as a side dish.

2 tablespoons (30 ml) honey
1/4 cup (60 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) black pepper
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) garlic powder
4 boneless pork loin chops

In a shallow glass dish or bowl, mix together honey, Worcestershire sauce, pepper, and garlic powder. Add pork chops and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for no more than 4 hours. Lightly oil grill and preheat to medium. Remove pork chops from marinade. Grill 20 to 30 minutes, or until cooked through, turning often.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 174 calories (22% from fat, 50% from protein, 27% from carbohydrate); 22 g protein; 4 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 12 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 9 g sugar; 238 mg phosphorus; 14 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 199 mg sodium; 503 mg potassium; 24 IU vitamin A; 2 mg ATE vitamin E; 28 mg vitamin C; 64 mg cholesterol; 80 g water


9. Tuna Steaks

If you get them on sale, tuna steaks are a good bargain, as well as containing lots of omega-3 fatty acids. The key to cooking them is not to overcook them and dry them out. It’s fine for them to be medium or even medium-rare. Soaking them in a simple marinade also helps to keep them moist and flavorful.

2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
6 ounces (170 g) tuna steaks
1/2 teaspoon (1 g) freshly ground black pepper

Combine the olive oil and lemon juice. Marinate the steaks in the mixture for at least 30 minutes, turning occasionally. Heat a skillet over high heat. Add the steaks and cook 2 minutes. Sprinkle with pepper, turn over, and cook 2 minutes longer.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 247 calories (65% from fat, 32% from protein, 3% from carbohydrate); 20 g protein; 18 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 11 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 2 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 218 mg phosphorus; 10 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 34 mg sodium; 240 mg potassium; 1861 IU vitamin A; 557 mg ATE vitamin E; 7 mg vitamin C; 32 mg cholesterol; 72 g water


10. Grilled Tuna with Honey Mustard Marinade

These tuna steaks can be grilled or broiled. If it’s not good weather for outdoor grilling, they also work well on a contact grill like the George Foreman models.

1/3 cup (80 ml) red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon (15 g) spicy brown mustard
1 tablespoon (15 ml) honey
3 tablespoons (45 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound (455 g) tuna steaks

Combine the vinegar, mustard, honey, and olive oil in a jar or covered container; shake to mix well. Put tuna in a resealable plastic bag; add the mustard mixture. Seal the bag and let marinate for about 20 minutes. Heat the grill. Remove the tuna from the marinade and pour the marinade in a small saucepan. Bring marinade to a boil; remove from heat and set aside. Grill the tuna over high heat for about 2 minutes on each side, or to desired doneness. Drizzle with the hot marinade.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 275 calories (53% from fat, 40% from protein, 7% from carbohydrate); 27 g protein; 16 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 9 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 5 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 294 mg phosphorus; 13 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 89 mg sodium; 302 mg potassium; 2478 IU vitamin A; 743 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 43 mg cholesterol; 100 g water


11. Poached Salmon

Poaching fish is a healthy way to cook it, as well as making sure it stays moist and adding a little extra flavor.

4 cups (946 ml) water
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
1/4 cup (30 g) carrot, thinly sliced
1/2 cup (80 g) onion, thinly sliced
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon (4 g) fresh dill, chopped
1/2 pound (225 g) salmon fillets

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Combine all ingredients except salmon in a saucepan and heat to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Place salmon in a glass baking dish large enough to hold salmon in a single layer; pour poaching liquid over. Cover and bake for 20 minutes, or until salmon flakes easily.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 238 calories (47% from fat, 40% from protein, 13% from carbohydrate); 24 g protein; 12 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 7 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 291 mg phosphorus; 71 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 97 mg sodium; 595 mg potassium; 2841 IU vitamin A; 17 mg ATE vitamin E; 16 mg vitamin C; 67 mg cholesterol; 614 g water



12. Grilled Salmon and Vegetables

On hot days, it’s sometimes a good idea to not use the stove at all. This recipe gives you protein, vegetables, and starch in one easy grilled packet.

1 cup (195 g) instant rice, uncooked
1 cup (235 ml) low sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup (56 g) zucchini, sliced
1/2 cup (60 g) carrot, shredded
1/2 pound (225 g) salmon fillets
1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) black pepper
1/2 lemon, sliced

Heat grill to medium. Spray two large pieces of heavy-duty aluminum foil with nonstick vegetable oil spray. In a small bowl, mix together rice and broth. Let stand for 5 minutes, or until most of broth is absorbed. Stir in zucchini and carrots, and set aside. Place a salmon fillet in the center of each piece of foil. Sprinkle with pepper and place lemon slices on top. Place rice mixture around each fillet. Fold up foil and bring edges together. Fold over several times to seal. Fold in ends, allowing some room for the rice to expand during cooking. Place on the grill and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, or until salmon is done.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 347 calories (35% from fat, 33% from protein, 32% from carbohydrate); 28 g protein; 14 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 5 g polyunsaturated fat; 28 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 369 mg phosphorus; 54 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 130 mg sodium; 765 mg potassium; 5502 IU vitamin A; 17 mg ATE vitamin E; 19 mg vitamin C; 67 mg cholesterol; 320 g water


13. Thyme Roasted Salmon

Simple in its preparation, with just three ingredients, this salmon doesn’t lack for flavor.

1 pound salmon fillets
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Spray a baking sheet with non-stick cooking spray. Place the fillets on the sheet. Sprinkle with thyme and pepper. Cook at 350°F until fish flakes easily, about 20 minutes.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 182 calories (55% from fat, 45% from protein, 1% from carb); 20 g protein ; 11 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 0 g carb; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 231 mg phosphorus; 17 mg calcium; 59 mg sodium; 362 mg potassium; 59 IU vitamin A; 15 mg ATE vitamin E; 4 mg vitamin C; 58 mg cholesterol


14. Lemon Baked Salmon



This method will give you a little more intense lemon flavor than most. You can use this same preparation for a number of kinds of fish.

1 lemon
1 pound (455 g) salmon fillets
1/4 cup (60 ml) lemon juice
2 tablespoons (6 g) dill
2 teaspoons (10 ml) olive oil

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Spray a 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33-cm) glass baking dish with nonstick vegetable oil spray. Slice lemon into 1/4-inch (0.6-cm) slices and place in bottom of pan. Lay fillets over slices. Combine lemon juice, dill, and oil and pour over fillets. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until fish flakes easily.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 213 calories (55% from fat, 38% from protein, 7% from carbohydrate); 20 g protein; 13 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 4 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 242 mg phosphorus; 44 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 62 mg sodium; 449 mg potassium; 146 IU vitamin A; 15 mg ATE vitamin E; 19 mg vitamin C; 58 mg cholesterol; 95 g water


15. Greek Islands Fish

The flavor of this fish will whisk you away to a Mediterranean island. Serve with couscous.

6 tilapia fillets
1 cup no salt added tomatoes, diced
1/2 cup artichoke hearts, chopped
1/2 cup ripe olives, chopped
1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled

Place fillets in a 9 × 13-inch baking pan coated with non-stick cooking spray. Top with remaining ingredients. Bake at 400°F for 15 to 20 minutes or until fish flakes easily.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 274 calories (53% from fat, 40% from protein, 6% from carb); 27 g protein ; 16 g total fat; 5 g saturated fat; 7 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 4 g carb; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 380 mg phosphorus; 101 mg calcium; 333 mg sodium; 612 mg potassium; 253 IU vitamin A; 39 mg ATE vitamin E; 7 mg vitamin C; 86 mg cholesterol


16. Baked Swordfish with Vegetables

This is a fairly simple recipe, with the flavor coming from the vegetables. It’s good with pasta or plain brown rice.

4 ounces (115 g) mushrooms, sliced
1 cup (160 g) onion, sliced
2 tablespoons (19 g) green bell pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon (0.3 g) dried dill
1 pound (455 g) swordfish steaks
4 small bay leaves
2 tomatoes, sliced

Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). In a bowl, combine mushrooms, onions, green bell pepper, lemon juice, and dill. Line a shallow baking pan with foil. Spread vegetable mixture in bottom then arrange swordfish steaks on top. Place a bay leaf and 2 tomato slices on each swordfish steak. Cover pan with foil and bake for 45 to 55 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 165 calories (26% from fat, 59% from protein, 15% from carbohydrate); 24 g protein; 5 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 6 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 339 mg phosphorus; 18 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 126 mg sodium; 529 mg potassium; 168 IU vitamin A; 41 mg ATE vitamin E; 12 mg vitamin C; 44 mg cholesterol; 159 g water


17. Herbed Fish

Simple baked fish made flavorful by a combination of herbs and spices.

2 pounds (905 g) perch, or other firm white fish
1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon (0.3 g) dried marjoram
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried thyme
1/8 teaspoon (0.3 g) white pepper
2 bay leaves
1/2 cup (80 g) onion, chopped
1/2 cup (120 ml) white wine

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Wash fish, pat dry, and place in 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33-cm) dish. Combine oil with garlic powder, marjoram, thyme, and white pepper. Drizzle over fish. Top with bay leaves and onion. Pour wine over all. Bake, uncovered, for 20 to 30 minutes, or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 277 calories (26% from fat, 69% from protein, 5% from carbohydrate); 43 g protein; 7 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 3 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 503 mg phosphorus; 253 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 173 mg sodium; 675 mg potassium; 100 IU vitamin A; 27 mg ATE vitamin E; 3 mg vitamin C; 95 mg cholesterol; 222 g water


18. Grilled Stuffed Portobellos

I discovered portobello mushrooms not too long ago. We like them grilled on a bun, but these Mediterranean-flavored ones are better served with pasta or rice.

2/3 cup (120 g) plum tomato, chopped
2 ounces (55 g) part-skim mozzarella, shredded
1 teaspoon (5 ml) olive oil, divided
1/2 teaspoon (0.4 g) fresh rosemary
1/8 teaspoon (0.3 g) coarsely ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) crushed garlic
4 portobello mushroom caps, about 4 to 5 inches (10 to 12.5 cm) each
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
2 teaspoons (2.6 g) fresh parsley

Prepare grill. Combine the tomato, cheese, 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) oil, rosemary, pepper, and garlic in a small bowl. Remove brown gills from the undersides of mushroom caps using a spoon, and discard. Remove stems; discard. Combine remaining 1/2 teaspoon oil (2.5 ml) and lemon juice in a small bowl. Brush over both sides of mushroom caps. Place the mushroom caps, stem sides down, on grill rack sprayed with nonstick vegetable oil spray, and grill for 5 minutes on each side or until soft. Spoon one-quarter of the tomato mixture into each mushroom cap. Cover and grill 3 minutes or until cheese is melted. Sprinkle with parsley.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 75 calories (40% from fat, 29% from protein, 32% from carbohydrate); 6 g protein; 4 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 1 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 6 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 181 mg phosphorus; 122 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 95 mg sodium; 490 mg potassium; 331 IU vitamin A; 18 mg ATE vitamin E; 8 mg vitamin C; 9 mg cholesterol; 115 g water


19. Caribbean Vegetable Curry

A moderately spicy vegetarian curry meal. Adjust the amount of cayenne to your taste.

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
1 cup (160 g) thinly sliced onion
3/4 teaspoon crushed garlic
1 apple, peeled, cored, and chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon coriander
1/8 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 cup (25 g) sliced scallions
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 cup (37 g) chopped peanuts


Heat oil in skillet. Sauté onion, garlic, and apple until soft. Combine curry powder, lemon peel, ginger, coriander, turmeric, and cayenne pepper. Stir into onion mixture. Add black-eyed peas, undrained kidney beans, and raisins. Cover; simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in yogurt. Place egg halves on rice. Spoon curry over. Top with radishes, scallions, cilantro, and peanuts.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 218 g water; 524 calories (12% from fat, 22% from protein, 66% from carb); 29 g protein; 7 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 89 g carbohydrate; 22 g fiber; 16 g sugar; 513 mg phosphorus; 238 mg calcium; 9 mg iron; 119 mg sodium; 1465 mg potassium; 495 IU vitamin A; 40 mg vitamin E; 13 mg vitamin C; 119 mg cholesterol


20. Zucchini Frittata

During the summer when the garden is producing I’m often looking for uses for zucchini, and this one is popular.

2 cups (250 g) shredded zucchini
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
1/2 cup (35 g) mushrooms, sliced
4 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup (37 g) Swiss cheese, shredded

Place the zucchini in a paper towel and squeeze out any excess moisture. Heat oil in a 10-inch (25-cm) skillet. Sauté the mushrooms briefly, then add the zucchini. Cook for 4 minutes, or until the squash is barely tender. Pour eggs over vegetables. Stir once quickly to coat vegetables. Cook over low heat until eggs begin to set. Sprinkle with the cheese. Place under the broiler until cheese browns. Let set for 2 to 3 minutes. Cut into wedges and serve.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 144 calories (59% from fat, 32% from protein, 9% from carbohydrate); 12 g protein; 10 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 6 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 3 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 174 mg phosphorus; 149 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 146 mg sodium; 310 mg potassium; 367 IU vitamin A; 4 mg ATE vitamin E; 11 mg vitamin C; 214 mg cholesterol; 125 g water


21. Ricotta Omelet

This makes a nice summer dinner, with a salad and bread. You could also add some vegetables if you like.

4 eggs
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) black pepper
1/2 cup (125 g) low fat ricotta cheese
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

Beat the eggs with the garlic powder, pepper, and ricotta. Heat the oil in a skillet or omelet pan. Add the egg mixture, and swirl to distribute evenly. Cook until nearly set, lifting edge to allow uncooked egg to run underneath. Fold over, cover, and cook until done.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 311 calories (66% from fat, 29% from protein, 6% from carbohydrate); 22 g protein; 23 g total fat; 6 g saturated fat; 12 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 4 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 266 mg phosphorus; 235 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 299 mg sodium; 398 mg potassium; 689 IU vitamin A; 65 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 440 mg cholesterol; 150 g water


22. Chicken Corn Chowder

A good soup for a cool fall day. Add bread and you have a meal.

6 potatoes, peeled and diced
1 1/2 cups (195 g) sliced carrot
1 cup (160 g) chopped onion
4 cups (950 ml) low-sodium chicken broth
12 ounces (340 g) frozen corn
2 cups (280 g) cooked, diced chicken
1 cup (235 ml) skim milk
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup (225 g) instant mashed potatoes

Cook potatoes, carrot, and onion in broth until soft. Add corn and chicken. Cook 5 minutes longer. Add milk, garlic powder, pepper, and mashed potatoes. Stir until potatoes are dissolved. Heat through.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 548 g water; 498 calories (10% from fat, 21% from protein, 69% from carb); 27 g protein; 6 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 89 g carbohydrate; 9 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 391 mg phosphorus; 117 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 169 mg sodium; 1716 mg potassium; 5617 IU vitamin A; 32 mg vitamin E; 39 mg vitamin C; 42 mg cholesterol


RELATED: Healthy Soup Recipes for Weight Loss


23. Italian Chicken Soup

One more cook-ahead meal for your slow cooker. This one is good either as a full meal or just to have on hand for lunches.

1 pound (455 g) boneless chicken breasts, cubed
4 cups (950 ml) low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups (480 g) low-sodium tomatoes
4 ounces (115 g) mushrooms, sliced
1/2 cup (65 g) sliced carrot
1/2 cup (56 g) sliced zucchini
1/2 cup (62 g) frozen green beans
6 ounces (170 g) frozen spinach
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon basil
1/2 teaspoon oregano

Combine ingredients and place in slow cooker. Cover and cook on low 8 to 10 hours or on high 4 to 5 hours.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 305 g water; 78 calories (17% from fat, 40% from protein, 43% from carb); 9 g protein; 2 g total fat; 0 g saturated fat; 1 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 10 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 133 mg phosphorus; 73 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 101 mg sodium; 568 mg potassium; 5706 IU vitamin A; 1 mg vitamin E; 23 mg vitamin C; 7 mg cholesterol


24. Beef Mushroom Soup with Barley

We have several recipes for beef vegetable soup that we make regularly, but this one is definitely a favorite. It just seems to be the kind of thing you want on a cold day.

1 pound (455 g) beef round steak, coarsely chopped
1 cup (160 g) onion, chopped
1 1/2 cups (105 g) mushrooms, sliced
2 cups (470 ml) reduced sodium beef broth
4 cups (946 ml) water
1 cup (200 g) pearl barley
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) garlic powder
2 teaspoons (10 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried thyme
1 cup (130 g) carrots, shredded
1/2 cup (60 g) celery, sliced
1/2 teaspoon (1 g) black pepper

Brown beef and onion. When beef is almost done add mushrooms and cook a few minutes more. Transfer to a slow cooker, add remaining ingredients, and cook on low for 8 to 10 hours.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 306 calories (14% from fat, 47% from protein, 39% from carbohydrate); 36 g protein; 5 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 30 g carbohydrate; 7 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 309 mg phosphorus; 43 mg calcium; 4 mg iron; 176 mg sodium; 699 mg potassium; 3637 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 8 mg vitamin C; 68 mg cholesterol; 348 g water


25. Beef Vegetable Soup

This is a pretty classic beef vegetable soup, the kind that country mothers have been making for years (except they probably didn’t use the slow cooker).

1 1/2 pounds (680 g) round steak, cut in 1/2-inch (1.3-cm) pieces
1 cup (160 g) onion, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup (50 g) celery, sliced
4 potatoes, cubed
4 cups (946 ml) reduced sodium beef broth
1 cup (70 g) cabbage, coarsely chopped
4 cups (750 g) frozen mixed vegetables, thawed
2 cups (360 g) canned no-salt-added tomatoes

Brown meat in a skillet and transfer to slow cooker. Add onion, celery, and potatoes. Pour broth over. Cook on low for 8 to 10 hours. Add cabbage, mixed vegetables, and tomatoes. Turn to high and cook for 30 minutes to 1 hour, or until vegetables are done.

Yield: 8 servings

Per serving: 373 calories (10% from fat, 39% from protein, 51% from carbohydrate); 37 g protein; 4 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 48 g carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 367 mg phosphorus; 85 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 446 mg sodium; 1525 mg potassium; 4015 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 31 mg vitamin C; 49 mg cholesterol; 486 g water


26. Cincinnati-Style Chili

Cincinnati, Ohio, claims to be where chili was created. Cincinnati-style chili is quite different from the more familiar Tex-Mex variety. The chili is thinner and contains an unusual blend of spices that includes cinnamon, chocolate or cocoa, allspice, and Worcestershire sauce. It’s usually served over spaghetti, although it’s good in a bowl by itself or as a hot dog topping.

1 cup (160 g) onion, chopped
1 pound (455 g) extra-lean ground beef (93% lean)
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) minced garlic
1 tablespoon (7.5 g) chili powder
1 teaspoon (1.9 g) ground allspice
1 teaspoon (2.3 g) cinnamon
1 teaspoon (2.5 g) cumin
1/2 teaspoon (0.9 g) cayenne pepper
1 1/2 tablespoons (8 g) unsweetened cocoa powder
16 ounces (455 g) no-salt-added tomato sauce
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon (15 ml) cider vinegar
1/2 cup (120 ml) water

In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, sauté onion, ground beef, garlic, and chili powder until ground beef is slightly cooked. Add remaining ingredients. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 1 1/2 hours.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 227 calories (32% from fat, 41% from protein, 27% from carbohydrate); 16 g protein; 6 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 10 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 156 mg phosphorus; 38 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 98 mg sodium; 598 mg potassium; 688 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 17 mg vitamin C; 52 mg cholesterol; 158 g water

Tip: To serve the traditional Cincinnati way, ladle chili over cooked spaghetti and serve with toppings of your choice. Oyster crackers are served on the side. Cincinnati chili is ordered by number: Two, Three, Four, or Five Way.

Two-Way Chili: Chili served on spaghetti
Three-Way Chili: Additionally topped with shredded Cheddar cheese
Four-Way Chili: Additionally topped with chopped onions
Five-Way Chili: Additionally topped with kidney beans


27. Vegetable Pasta Sauce

Low in calories, fat free, 3 grams of fiber, and great Italian flavor on top of all that.

1 cup (160 g) finely chopped onion
1 teaspoon crushed garlic
2 teaspoons basil
1 1/2 teaspoons oregano
1 bay leaf
28 ounces (800 g) no-salt-added canned tomatoes
16 ounces (455 g) no-salt-added tomato sauce
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, fresh ground
4 tablespoons (16 g) chopped fresh parsley

In a large pot, heat onion, garlic, basil, oregano, bay leaf, tomatoes, tomato sauce, pepper, and parsley. Mix well, mashing tomatoes with a fork. Bring to boiling, reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally for 1 1/2 hours. Remove bay leaf. Serve over whole wheat pasta.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 218 g water; 64 calories (5% from fat, 14% from protein, 81% from carb); 2 g protein; 0 g total fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 14 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 61 mg phosphorus; 71 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 28 mg sodium; 597 mg potassium; 668 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 28 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol


28. Tuna Alfredo Sauce

If you’re looking for something a little different to put over pasta, this could be just the thing.

2 tablespoons (28 g) butter
4 ounces (115 g) mushrooms, sliced
2 tablespoons (16 g) flour
1 cup (235 ml) skim milk
1 can (6-ounce, or 170-g) tuna
2 tablespoons (10 g) Parmesan cheese, grated

Melt butter in a saucepan and sauté mushrooms. Stir in flour, then slowly add milk and tuna, cooking and stirring until thickened and bubbly. Remove from heat and stir in cheese.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 114 calories (20% from fat, 54% from protein, 27% from carbohydrate); 15 g protein; 2 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 7 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 214 mg phosphorus; 130 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 107 mg sodium; 312 mg potassium; 147 IU vitamin A; 44 mg ATE vitamin E; 1 mg vitamin C; 32 mg cholesterol; 114 g water


29. Szechuan Chicken


Szechuan Chicken


A spicy Szechuan dish made with diced chicken, peanuts, and chile peppers.

For Marinade:

1 1/2 tablespoons (22 ml) water
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Dick’s Reduced Sodium Soy Sauce (see recipe page 25)
1 1/2 tablespoons (12 g) cornstarch
1 tablespoon (15 ml) rice wine

For Chicken:

1 pound (455 g) boneless chicken breasts
2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil
8 dried chile peppers
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) minced garlic
1/2 cup (75 g) green bell pepper, cut in 1/2-inch (1.3-cm) pieces
1/2 cup (75 g) dry-roasted peanuts

For Sauce:

2 tablespoons (30 ml) Dick’s Reduced Sodium Soy Sauce (see recipe page 25)
1 tablespoon (15 ml) sherry
1 tablespoon (13 g) sugar
1 teaspoon (3 g) cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon (1 ml) sesame oil

To make the marinade: Mix together marinade ingredients.

To make the chicken: Marinate chicken for at least 20 minutes. Heat wok. When hot, add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil. When oil is hot, add dried chile peppers and garlic and stir-fry until brown and fragrant. Add the green pepper cubes. After approximately two minutes, push the peppers up the side of the wok and add the chicken cubes in the middle of the wok. Stir-fry until the chicken cubes are thoroughly cooked.

To make the sauce: Combine sauce ingredients and add into the wok. Stir until thickened. Add peanuts just before removing the chicken mixture from the wok.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 288 calories (17% from fat, 22% from protein, 61% from carbohydrate); 31 g protein; 11 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 5 g polyunsaturated fat; 87 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 7 g sugar; 304 mg phosphorus; 32 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 156 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium; 383 IU vitamin A; 7 mg ATE vitamin E; 17 mg vitamin C; 66 mg cholesterol; 129 g water


30. Carne Asada

Most recipes call for skirt or flank steak for this, but any cut of beef will do. The London broil, or round steak, is relatively inexpensive and low in fat.

2 pounds (905 g) beef round steak
1/4 cup (60 ml) lime juice
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) minced garlic
2 tablespoons (5.3 g) Mexican seasoning

Place steak in resealable plastic bag with lime juice and garlic. Marinate 2 hours, turning occasionally. Remove from marinade; rub 1 tablespoon (2.6 g) of Mexican seasoning on each side. Grill over medium heat until desired doneness. Slice thinly to serve.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 304 calories (23% from fat, 75% from protein, 1% from carbohydrate); 55 g protein; 8 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 1 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 343 mg phosphorus; 8 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 68 mg sodium; 518 mg potassium; 5 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 3 mg vitamin C; 136 mg cholesterol; 98 g water


31. Low Fat Carnitas

Carnitas is crispy spiced pork that can be used for tacos, burritos, tostadas, or sandwiches.

2 pounds (905 g) pork loin
1/2 cup (80 g) onion, sliced
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon (1.3 g) cumin
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) garlic powder

In a 3-quart (2.8-L) saucepan combine pork, onion, garlic, oregano, and cumin; add enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 2 hours. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Drain meat and place in a baking pan. Sprinkle meat with garlic powder. Bake for 45 minutes. Remove from oven. While meat is still warm, use forks to shred meat.

Yield: 8 servings

Per serving: 151 calories (30% from fat, 67% from protein, 3% from carbohydrate); 24 g protein; 5 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 1 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 252 mg phosphorus; 20 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 59 mg sodium; 440 mg potassium; 14 IU vitamin A; 2 mg ATE vitamin E; 2 mg vitamin C; 71 mg cholesterol; 92 g water


32. Broccoli and Tomato Salad

As pretty as it is tasty, this salad is great with a piece of grilled meat or an egg dish like quiche.

1 pound (455 g) broccoli
1/4 pound (115 g) mushrooms
3/4 cup (75 g) olives, drained
8 ounces (225 g) cherry tomatoes

Dressing

1/3 cup (80 ml) olive oil
1 tablespoon (15 ml) white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon (15 ml) lemon juice
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup (25 g) minced scallions
1/4 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, fresh ground

Trim florets from broccoli, you should have about 1 quart (1 L). Reserve stems for another use. Drop broccoli florets into boiling water for 1 minute or just until they turn bright green; drain. Trim mushroom stems to 1/2 inch (1 cm). Combine broccoli, mushrooms, olives, and cherry tomatoes in bowl. Measure oil, vinegar, lemon juice, parsley, scallions, garlic, and pepper into small bowl. Whisk until blended. Pour dressing over vegetable mixture. Turn gently to coat vegetables. Cover and refrigerate 3 hours or more until ready to serve.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 162 g water; 249 calories (72% from fat, 7% from protein, 20% from carb); 5 g protein; 21 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 15 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 13 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 104 mg phosphorus; 88 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 261 mg sodium; 603 mg potassium; 1351 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 117 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol

Tip: This is a colorful salad to serve in a glass bowl.


33. Broccoli Cauliflower Salad

Broccoli Cauliflower Salad


Simple salad that is good with grilled meat or any of a number of other meals.

1 pound (455 g) broccoli, cut in florets
1 pound (455 g) cauliflower, cut in florets
1 cup (160 g) thinly sliced red onion
1/2 cup (115 g) mayonnaise
1/4 cup (60 ml) vinegar
1/4 cup (50 g) sugar
1/4 cup (60 ml) salad oil
3 tablespoons (45 ml) mustard

Mix broccoli and cauliflower florets. Add onion and combine other ingredients. Pour over vegetables. Refrigerate 2 hours before serving.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 174 g water; 307 calories (69% from fat, 6% from protein, 25% from carb); 4 g protein; 24 g total fat; 4 g saturated fat; 10 g monounsaturated fat; 9 g polyunsaturated fat; 20 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 13 g sugar; 88 mg phosphorus; 63 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 143 mg sodium; 413 mg potassium; 538 IU vitamin A; 15 mg vitamin E; 103 mg vitamin C; 7 mg cholesterol


34. Corn Salad

Corn Salad - Easy Heart Healthy Recipes


Slightly sweet from the apple and very crunchy, this salad is great with barbecued meats.

1 cup (150 g) diced green bell pepper
1 avocado, cubed
1 cup (150 g) chopped apple
2 cups (328 g) corn, cooked and cooled
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon (15 ml) red wine vinegar
3 tablespoons (45 ml) olive oil

Place pepper, avocado, apple, and corn in salad bowl. Stir to mix. Combine remaining ingredients and pour over salad, tossing lightly.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 151 g water; 234 calories (56% from fat, 5% from protein, 38% from carb); 3 g protein; 16 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 11 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 24 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 77 mg phosphorus; 14 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 23 mg sodium; 386 mg potassium; 201 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 37 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol

Tip: For a Mexican salad, omit the apple and add a teaspoon of ground cumin to the dressing.


RELATED: Cucumber Salad Recipes


35. Marinated Zucchini Salad

This is a nice summer salad that can help to use up those extra zucchini when the garden is producing more than you can eat.

2 cups (220 g) thinly sliced zucchini
1/2 cup (35 g) thinly sliced mushrooms
1 cup (300 g) artichoke hearts, drained and sliced
1 can bamboo shoots, drained
1/2 cup (120 ml) Italian dressing

Mix all but dressing together in a large bowl. Pour dressing over ingredients and stir to mix. Marinate several hours or overnight.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 181 g water; 129 calories (57% from fat, 10% from protein, 32% from carb); 4 g protein; 9 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 11 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 76 mg phosphorus; 26 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 520 mg sodium; 368 mg potassium; 212 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 14 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol

35 Easy Heart Healthy Recipes

I recently read a very good post on the professional social network, LinkedIn, by Mareo McCracken, This is Why You Are Sabotaging Relationships (+ 8 Actionable Ideas to Build Incredible Ones*). It was on the subject of sabotaging relationships when it comes to success (or failure) in business. It stood out for me because of two words: SABOTAGING and RELATIONSHIPS.

Are You In An Unhealthy Relationship With Yourself?


I talk to clients daily about sabotage and their relationships... because those are two components of why people gain weight, why they chose not to do anything about it and/or how they battle with it. I talk to them about the need to recognize those in their lives (so-called friends, spouses, co-workers, etc.) who intentionally try to sabotage their (and sometimes medically necessary) weight loss efforts at every turn. I also talk to them about the need to own up to their own habits of self-sabotage which prevent them from achieving the very thing they want most: to lose weight and be healthy.

When it comes to the relationships part of our discussions, I focus on the most important relationship of all: the one they have with themselves! Those trying to overcome/conquer an addiction or break a bad habit or just get out of a bad, unhealthy situation (i.e., a human relationship, an unsatisfying job), have an angel on one shoulder and a devil on the other. I talk to my clients about the need to understand that the relationship with themselves takes precedence over all else: Until they realize they ARE worthy of being happy; deserving of being slim and healthy; until they stop accepting the bad, negative self-talk ("I'm fat", "I'm so overweight I'm ugly", "I'll never be in a good relationship because I'm obese" and the list goes on)--which, by the way, they would NEVER accept hearing from anyone else--they'll never be strong enough to slay the devil and then only have the sweet, positive whisperings of the angel to listen to!

In Mr. McCracken's blog, he offers 6 reasons why a business person will have problems with a client or prospect relationship, and I am going to use those same 6 points as they apply to weight loss. He wrote, "When you have problems in a relationship it is probably because you... "

Talked too much.

Do you constantly talk to yourself and others about how badly you feel being overweight, but do nothing about it? How can you have a good, healthy relationship with yourself if you only talk or hope or tell yourself you want to achieve something, but never do anything about it.
Didn't listen (because you were talking, or wanting to talk).

I encounter this all the time: clients who hear me, but never truly listen. As I am talking to them, I can see they are thinking about what they are going to say next. They have all the answers. They know it all. How can you have a healthy relationship with yourself if you never listen to what others (your physician, those around you who love you) are saying and take what they are saying seriously? How can you have good, meaningful, trustworthy relationships with anyone if you only hear them and 'yes' them at every turn, but don't act on any of the advice and counsel they give you... especially when it comes to your health? Aren't you conveying to them that their concern for you is irrelevant? When those who love you, and who are genuinely scared because they see how your weight is affects you physically and emotionally, see that you take no actions to lose weight and improve your health despite their sincerity in telling you how they feel, eventually they stop conveying their feelings and pull away... and relationships change.




Thought your needs were more important than the other person's needs.

Is your emotional need to be overweight or obese more important than the way your spouse or partner feels about it, especially if you are not the same person physically as when you met? What about their needs, and not just when it comes to intimacy, but to their desire to live a long, active life... with you? And, if, because of your weight, you deliberately push intimacy away, or your spouse or partner shows less interest in that regard, how is it possible to feel good about yourself? Is that healthy? Or what about the needs of your children? Do their concerns for your obesity and fear for your health matter to you? If not, is that healthy? Would you rather have cake in your life, or love and passion of people and activities in a your life?

Forgot the purpose of the relationship. 

The foremost purpose of the relationships we have with ourselves-beyond, of course, to continue learning and expanding our horizons and interests; to be good citizens; to be respectful and considerate; etc.-is to take care of ourselves, to nurture ourselves, to do all possible to enrich our lives... and the foundation to good living is good health. You cannot have good health being overweight or obese. The longer you are, the progression of health changes from good to bad and from bad to worse.

Stopped nurturing the relationship.

This point is obvious: If you are fat, and make no attempt to lose weight, you have stopped nurturing the relationship with your body. If you make a half-hearted attempt to lose weight and give up, or you start and give up repeatedly, you have also stopped nurturing the relationship you have with your body.

Made yourself the "hero" instead of them.

Is what YOU want in the moment more important than long-term health? Is your daily life only about YOU? Do you ever think about how your weight, your size, your health affects your ability or prospects for career success? Do you ever consider how less mobility, less energy and stamina, and physical limitations affect those around you, including and especially your children? Or, are you the hero of your day every day and to hell with what anyone else thinks? Are you always the hero, the 'winner' and those whose lives are also affected by your weight and health the 'losers?'

When you talk too much and don't listen; when you think your needs are more important than others who care about you; when you forget the purpose of the relationship with yourself and stop nurturing the relationship you have with yourself; and when you make yourself the hero by focusing only on what you want in the moment over what could be achieved long-term... you sabotage a healthy relationship with yourself.

You get the relationships you think you deserve. When you're in a bad relationship-especially the one you have with yourself--you need to change the way you think about yourself. The way you think about yourself and the way you talk to yourself creates your experiences: Your relationship with yourself is the foundation of everything.



____________________

* Mr. McCracken's article

I am passionate about helping my clients become slim and healthy. I write and release weekly blogs and Fat Chat podcasts to educate and motivate on all issues related to #weightloss, #obesity, health and wellness, diet and lifestyle change.

Visit me at http://www.weightnomoredietcenter.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Lori_Boxer/2169327

Are You In An Unhealthy Relationship With Yourself?