FITBODYUSA: healthy eating
Showing posts with label healthy eating. Show all posts
Showing posts with label healthy eating. Show all posts
Mornings are hard. Add declining temperatures and busier lifestyles into the equation and we barely have the energy to brush our hair, let alone think about preparing a healthy breakfast. When you have little time, energy and motivation, preparing a smoothie is a great way to save precious time amid the morning chaos.

Happy Healthy Smoothies for Breakfast


Read on to see 5 of our favorite healthy smoothies recipes to see which one is right for you:

1. You need to eat more vegetables


Add kale, spinach, chard, cabbage, cucumber, or a teaspoon of greens powder to your smoothie to increase your vegetable count for the day (and before 9 a.m., at a minimum). This green pear smoothie has a handful of spinach that is not only good for the digestive tract, but spinach has also been shown to help relaxation. Buy it in bulk and store it in the freezer for a cost effective addition to any recipe.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup packed spinach leaves
  • 1 cup packed kale leaves
  • 1 green apple, cored and diced
  • 1/2 lemon juice
  • 1/2 cucumber
  • 1/2 teaspoon raw honey
  • 1/2 cup water

2. You're starving an hour after starting work.


We are great advocates of eating fruits and vegetables, but without protein your hunger will only be satisfied for so long. Whey protein has been shown to keep insulin levels under control and whether you opt for a vegan version, or a dairy-free version, there are a number of powders on the market that contain a big hit of protein without the unwanted calories. Find out how to make your perfect protein-rich smoothie here.


INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 ripe banana
  • 1/3 of a cup of strawberries
  • 1/3 of a cup of blueberries
  • 1/2 a cup of kale leaves (remove the hard parts of the stalks)
  • 1/4 of a cup of almond milk or water
  • 1 tablespoon of ground flax seed
  • 1 tablespoon of whey protein (or your favorite protein powder)
  • 1 tablespoon of chia seeds
  • 1 tablespoon of acai

3. Need a Brain Stimulus


Whether you're dazed in the morning or need to turn on for an early morning meeting, blueberries have been shown to improve cognitive function. Rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals, smoothies made with berries (raspberries and strawberries also apply here!) Can make you look and feel younger too! This cranberry smoothie is combined with nuts that contain essential fatty acids to help you forget less and stay alert all day long.


INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1/4 cup raw old fashioned oats
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup greek yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
  • 4 ice cubes

4. You're on a low-calorie diet


With less than 150 calories per serving, our test kitchen is perfect if you're trying to lose weight. Rich in calcium and protein (thanks to yogurt) this smoothie also works to aid digestion thanks to the known digestive enzymes of papaya. Avoid store-bought versions of this smoothie that can have more than 500 calories per serving!

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup Coconut Water
  • 1 cup papaya fresh
  • 1/2 cup Plain Nonfat Greek Yogurt
  • 1/2 banana frozen
  • 1/2 cup ice

5. Want to be more alkaline


If you are lethargic, in a bad mood, in poor health, or with a sense of toxicity, your body may be in an acid state. Our body's healthy pH (hydrogen potential) level is seven, so any higher or lower level will have important effects on the body and health. Eating breakfast every day is one of the main recommendations when it comes to rebalancing your body's pH, and this alkalinizing smoothie is the perfect combination. Filled with fruits and vegetables, this recipe will help counteract the effects of stress, alcohol consumption and bad sleep habits that often lead to high acid levels.

INGREDIENTS:


  • 1 avocado, peeled and pitted
  • 1 cup raw almond milk
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • A few leaves of kale
  • A few mint leaves
  • A few cucumber slices
  • Pinch of cinnamon
Happy Healthy Smoothies for Breakfast



What's your favorite smoothie recipe? Share it with us below.

5 Happy Healthy Smoothies for Breakfast




If you want to make your exercise routine even more effective at burning fat and losing weight, take note of the pre-workout and post-workout foods that help you lose weight in a healthy way.

What You Should Eat before and After Workout To Lose Weight


Even if your goal is to lose weight, experts agree that intense exercise on an empty stomach is not a good idea. Playing sports involves an extra expense of energy for our body. If you don't have enough, you'll probably train for less time and end up with fatigue or starvation (encouraging you to overeat after exercise). This situation is not ideal for achieving the goal of weight loss and may also cause damage to your muscles that may have had to rely on their glycogen stores to maintain activity.

It is also not about overeating by eating more calories than you burn by exercising, because then you simply wouldn't lose a single gram. When choosing what to eat before and after weight loss workout, consider the type of activity you are going to do, its intensity, your own physical needs and also the time between eating the food and getting going.

If you want to know what to eat before and after exercising, you should of course not eat the same thing if you are training within 15 minutes of lunch as if you plan to eat it three hours after lunch. A good balance between carbohydrates, fast and slow absorption, and protein depends largely on the effectiveness of training in terms of weight loss.

What foods help you lose weight before and after exercise?


As a general rule, before training, carbohydrates take centre stage. Your body needs energetic but low-fat foods for exercise. A piece of fruit, for example a banana, a juice, or a snack in the form of a wholemeal toast with jam or yogurt with some oatmeal flakes are three good suggestions of foods that you can eat before training and that you take 20 or 30 minutes before carrying out an intense routine.

If we talk about a longer period of time between food and training, slow absorption carbohydrates come into play, those that will provide energy as the body demands it. A plate of pasta or rice and some high glycemic index fruit, such as melon or watermelon, can be the basis of an ideal menu for someone who plans to practice sports in the following hours. In this case, protein should also be present in the food you eat, especially if your training involves resistance (swimming, running, etc.) or intense muscle work (gym weights).

If you want to lose weight, include lean meats or fish in your meal and if you prefer to have just one snack, try a brown rice cake, on which you can put some slices of turkey breast or a portion of tortilla (French).

What to eat after workout to avoid weight gain?

After training hard, you'll want to know what foods to eat after training so you don't get fat, and which are recommended to keep your body burning calories while recovering from the effort. The first step is to achieve correct hydration so that the body replenishes the water and lost electrolytes. For some sportsmen and women, there is nothing better than a good glass of milk 15 - 20 minutes after the practice of their activity (you can also choose isotonic drinks). If you also notice that you need to "recharge" energy, always use "slow" carbohydrates.

The cereal bars give excellent results in order not to get fat after exercising. After a reasonable amount of time, it's time to provide the protein needed for muscle recovery and also the minerals, vitamins and fiber your body needs: salads, boiled vegetables, fish rich in omega-3s and lean meats can be ideal for a dinner around the gym. Watch what you eat before and after training if you want to lose weight, because it's important.

RELATED: How to Make a High Protein Breakfast

What You Should Eat before and After Workout To Lose Weight
 

What You Should Eat before and After Workout To Lose Weight




Nutrition is still full of myths. But sports training is not an understatement either. So you can imagine what happens when we unite both spheres and talk about sports nutrition: a jumble of beliefs and legends.

Meal Schedule, Bodybuilding and Sports Performance


A few weeks ago, the International Society of Sports Nutrition published its position on a popular topic of sports nutrition, the influence on sports performance and muscle development of the timing and composition of meals and their synchronization with exercise (nutrient timing). The document is entitled "International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing (2017)" and for those who prefer a shortened version, these are its conclusions translated into Spanish:

1. Endogenous glycogen reserves are maximized by following a high-carbohydrate diet (8-12 g of carbohydrate per kg body weight per day); these reserves are depleted primarily by high exercise volume.

  • If rapid glycogen recharge (<4 hours) is required, the following strategies should be considered:
  • Carbohydrate intake (1.2 g / kg / h) with preference for sources with high glycaemic index (> 70)
  • Adding caffeine (3-8 mg/kg)
  • Combine carbohydrates (0.8 g / kg / h) with protein (0.2-0.4 g / kg / h).

3. Prolonged (> 60 min) high intensity (> 70% VO2max) exercise challenges energy supply and fluid regulation, so carbohydrates should be consumed at a rate of ~ 30-60 g of carbohydrate / h at 6-8% (180-360 ml) every 10-15 min throughout the exercise, particularly in those exercise sessions that go beyond 70 min. When carbohydrate supply is inadequate, the addition of protein can help increase performance, improve muscle damage, promote euglycemia and facilitate glycogen re-synthesis.

4. Carbohydrate intake throughout strength exercise (e.g., 3-6 series of 8-12 maximum repetitions using multiple exercises targeting all major muscle groups) has been shown to promote euglycemia and increase glycogen stores. Consuming carbohydrates alone or in combination with protein during strength exercise increases muscle glycogen stores, improves muscle damage and facilitates greater training adaptations, both short and long term.

5. Achieving total daily protein intake should be considered important, preferably with evenly spaced feeding (approximately every 3-4 hours during the day), .

6.Ingestion of essential amino acids (EAA, approximately 10 g), either in free form or as part of a protein bolus of approximately 20-40 g, has been shown to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS).

7. Pre- and post-exercise nutritional interventions (carbohydrates + protein or protein alone) can work as an effective strategy to support increased strength and improved body composition. However, the size and timing of a preexercise meal can affect the need for protein feeding after exercise.

8. Post-exercise (up to 2 hours after completion) intake of high-quality protein sources stimulates muscle protein synthesis (MPS).

9. In a scenario without exercise, changing the frequency of meals has shown little impact on weight loss and body composition, and there is some evidence that the frequency of meals can favorably improve appetite and satiety. More research is needed to determine the influence of combining an exercise programme with changes in meal frequency on weight loss and body composition; preliminary research indicates potential benefit

10. Intake of a 20-40 g protein dose (0.25-0.40 g/kg body mass/dose) from a high-quality source every three to four hours appears to affect the rate of muscle protein synthesis more favourably than other dietary patterns and is associated with better body composition and performance results.

11. Consuming casein (~ 30-40 g) before sleep can increase muscle synthesis and metabolic rate throughout the night without influencing lipolysis.

The document is freely accessible, so if you are interested in the subject, I encourage you to read it in its entirety.

RELATED: Muscle Hypertrophy vs Strength - Yes, There is a Difference

On the other hand, I would remind you that you do not need to spend money on supplements, shakes and pills to comply with these recommendations, you can also follow them (I would say even healthier) by simply planning your diet properly.

In addition, these are conclusions on which experts have found evidence of some strength, so I would forget any other statements or advice we may have heard regarding meal times, sports performance and bodybuilding. They probably don't have enough evidence behind it.

Meal Schedule, Muscle Development and Sports Performance




When designing a weight loss diet, very fatty (and therefore calorie) foods are usually on the unwanted list or at least on the "eat in great moderation" list. After all, a lot of fat means a lot of calories. But we have already seen in several articles that this reasoning is not always correct. For example, we saw that the studies have not been able to find a correlation between nuts and overweight, since there are other factors in their composition that end up compensating in a favorable way for their energy intake.

Avocado, An Exceptional Food That Does Not Make You Fat


Avocado is another of these atypical foods. In several ways. First of all because it is one of the few fruits in whose nutritional composition the main macronutrient is fat, instead of the usual carbohydrates, which gives it a high energy density of almost 700 kJ (160 kilocalories) per hundred grams. Most of it is monounsaturated fat, so its effect on health is beyond suspicion and the exceptional amount of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and fibre it also provides is well known. But the truth is that, despite the praise that comes with it, it is also often recommended to eat in moderation in weight loss processes, because of the commented calories that accompany it.

Since to date there was not much meaningful evidence on its relationship to obesity, little could be added to this, but fortunately, that evidence is beginning to emerge. The study "Avocado consumption is associated with better diet quality and nutrient intake, and lower metabolic syndrome risk in US adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001--2008" has just been published. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) has analysed the relationship between various indicators and this tasty fruit by observing more than 17,000 people over eight years.

With all the precautions that must be taken in a single observational study, the results are clearly positive. They indicate that people who eat more avocado have a better diet, more nutrients, less risk of metabolic syndrome and less weight. Yes, less weight, despite all its calories.

Regarding possible intervention trials, the only one I have found is "A randomized 3×3 crossover study to evaluate the effect of Hass avocado intake on post-ingestive satiety, glucose and insulin levels, and subsequent energy intake in overweight adults" (2013), a small study in which the effect of adding half an avocado to the diet was analysed. The researchers found that their intake increased satisfaction and satiety and reduced the insulinemic response after mealtime. In addition, the final calorie balance was not negatively affected, i.e. no more calories were ingested when eating ad-libitum.

So you know, for the moment you can incorporate it into your meals without fear. If you spend a little time searching for recipes online, you'll be amazed at how many delicious ways you can take them.

RELATED: 5 Healthy Salad Recipes for Fat Loss and Muscle-Building

Avocado, An Exceptional Food That Does Not Make You Fat




The flu is spreading throughout Europe and we all hope to be spared. For all those who have already done it or want to prevent it, here are a few smoothie recipes with a bunch of good, strengthening ingredients. Cheers!

Super Smoothies For The Immune System


Smoothies are not only healthy, they are also super tasty, quite easy to mix yourself and on top of that they are visually quite something. Here are our 3 favorite recipes and a few tips on how to jump on this healthy super trend.


Green Smoothie


Green Power

2x handful of fresh spinach
1x approx. 10cm of fresh cucumber in small cubes
1x fresh green, juicy apple in narrow slices
1x small mint branch
(optional) 4x ice cubes, if your machine can mix them



Strengthening Detox-Smoothie


Strengthening Detox-Smoothie

1x peel juicy orange and use it completely (do not squeeze)
½ Juice lemon
½ Banana
1x cup of light green tea (should not have pulled longer than 3 minutes)
100ml almond milk



Summery Stimulant Smoothie


Summery Stimulant Smoothie

1x handful of blueberries
4x medium strawberries
2x handful of watermelon cubes
½ Mango


And here are a few quick tips:

A visit to the weekly market just before the stands are dismantled can not only be spontaneous inspiration for the next smoothie, but also saves your wallet.

If you suddenly land at home with 4 bunches of bananas, 5 avocado and 3 boxes of blueberries (from experience: Yes, it happens), then now comes the super trick: wash fruit, if necessary dice it and divide it into glass-compatible, tasty combined portions. These portions can then be individually frozen and defrosted if necessary. For example, you can save time in the morning, ensure a healthy, tasty breakfast, while the freezing condition makes the smoothie even creamier.

RELATED: Healthy Smoothies for Weight Loss


So and now: off to the market and then merry pureeing. Have fun!

Super Smoothies For The Immune System




The amount of diets that can be chosen today by those who want to lose weight is growing steadily. Not only well-known concepts such as FHD or Low Fat determine the events here, but also newer methods. Low carb, the most extensive renunciation of carbohydrates, is one of the more modern variants and is hyped by many women and men downright. That the concept seems to work is obvious. But what is important if carbohydrates should no longer play a big role in the future?

Lose Weight With Low-carb - Exciting Possibilities in The Kitchen



WHAT IS LOW-CARB?

The low-carb diet, as it is known today, is considered a descendant of the classic Atkins diet. Atkins, with forty percent protein and 45 percent fat in the daily diet, was much stricter and slower, allowing low-carb to relax. This makes this form of nutrition more popular, because the conversion is not only easier at first glance and varied and nutrient-rich food planning are possible. This gave the low-carb diet in the context of a German survey from 2013 quite good values. Here, around four percent of all respondents favored low-carb. Just as many appreciated famous alternatives such as fasting or calorie counting. Systems such as Weight Watchers were only marginally more popular at just under six percent.

But how does the low-carb procedure work? Basically, the reduction of carbohydrate intake plays a significant role here. The body is accustomed to extracting energy from carbohydrates and converting possible surpluses into flab. Anyone who deprives him of the carbohydrates as the basis for energy production, sets in motion a restructuring. Then the body begins to gain its energy from proteins and fats, which stimulates the removal of unwanted cushions. The advantage for many: starvation and low carb do not belong together, because there are good alternatives that fill the plate neatly several times a day.

The basic principle of the low-carb diet uses - like many other diets too - the percentage participation of the three macronutrients. These should be broken down as follows:

  • Fat content: 50 to 60 percent
  • Protein content: 35 percent
  • Carbohydrate content: 15 to 30 percent (maximum 100 to 120 grams daily)

Since percentage values ​​are initially confusing, people wanting to lose weight should know their daily calorie needs. This then enables the calculation of actual values. It helps to know that one gram of protein and carbohydrates each provide about 4.1 calories. One gram of fat, however, accounts for 9.3 calories. As additional help to get a common thread, additional recommendations apply. Thus, the amount of carbohydrates in a low-carb diet should be a maximum of 100 to 120 grams per day, while one to two grams of protein per kilogram of body weight are considered useful. The rest of the diet is then fat.

RELATED: Low Carb Diets - Carb Concepts


FAT IN LOW CARB DIET: PLEASE HIGH QUALITY!

The fact is: Even in the low-carb diet, of course, fat is not the same fat. Probably the most important distinction that men and women should know is that between saturated, unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Basically, fat in the diet is actually not an unhealthy ingredient, but can quickly become one.

For then, if the fat sources are inferior and above all provide unsaturated fatty acids, no real consumer success is possible. So if you think you can lose weight with lots of high-fat meat, butter, cream and fat chocolate, sooner or later you will fail. It is better to concentrate on unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and to keep the content of saturated fatty acids as low as possible.
Good oil provides valuable fatty acids.

FAT IN LOW CARB DIET - Olive Oil


Unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids usually originate from plants, seeds and nuts. Integrating healthy fat into your daily diet is easier with high-quality oils. Using good oils such as olive oil, linseed oil, thistle oil or even grapeseed oil is a clever move, because every oil has its own individual taste and scores high in its content of unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fandler supplies exact values ​​for each oil, which can be used by interested parties.

Anyone who takes care to use every oil according to their purpose increases the possibilities in their own kitchen immensely. So oils such as rapeseed oil, coconut oil or olive oil are good for searing low-fat meat, fish or vegetables. However, variants such as linseed, pumpkin seed or thistle oil do not tolerate the heat in pot and pan. They should therefore be used rather cold. However, as an addition to the morning cereal or in salad dressing, these oils can also be used perfectly without heat.

MEAL ALTERNATIVES HELPING CREATIVITY ON THE JUMP

Anyone who wants to feed on the low-carb principle, reaches a point at the latest after a few weeks, at the actually beloved food to start missing. To do without biscuits, cakes and even bread is not easy for every weight loss taker. White flour, however, is arguably the biggest enemy of any low-carbohydrate diet, and it does not score high on nutrients even off this diet. It is therefore generally advisable to banish light flour from the diet.

Low carb baking is possible with a few flour alternatives


Low carb baking is possible with a few flour alternatives.

But wholemeal flour also has a fairly high proportion of carbohydrates. However, since it provides many nutrients and fiber, it may be used in the context of a low-carb diet quite a small extent. However, the small amount is not enough to bake something delicious and alternatives must come from. Since the market has long since recognized this, there are now some exciting flour varieties that can be used in baking and have comparatively few carbohydrates.

Good examples for this are:
Flour variant                        Carbohydrates per 100 grams

Almond flour                          Four to seven grams
Coconut flour                         Nine to 15 grams
Chiamehl                                Zero grams
Soy flour                                Three to five grams


Each of these flours can then be used in baking bread, cakes or biscuits to complement the wholegrain flour. However, it is important to know how the individual flours behave. Almond flour and soy flour need a little more liquid, otherwise doughs will quickly become too firm. However, if you experiment a little and also add chopped nuts, grated coconut, cracked flax seeds or oatmeal (in small quantities) to the dough, you will quickly find your own secret recipe for low carbohydrate biscuits.

RELATED: Low Carb Desserts - Yogurt With Strawberries and Sunflower Seeds (low carb)

Lose Weight With Low-carb: Exciting Possibilities in The Kitchen




Yogurt with strawberries and sesame crunch (low carb)


Delicious low carb breakfast with strawberries and sunflower seeds. Good to prepare and in a glass with lid also good to take away to work.

Low Carb Desserts - Yogurt With Strawberries and Sunflower Seeds


Preparation:

1. Wash the strawberries, remove the green, cut them into small pieces and divide them into two glasses.
2. Mix yogurt with two tablespoons of xylitol and a pinch of vanilla and add to the strawberries.
3. Melt the coconut oil in a small pan, add 2 tablespoons of xylitol and sunflower seeds and fry over medium heat until the sesame is golden yellow.
4. Pour the toasted sunflower seeds over the yoghurt and enjoy.

Ingredients:

  • 180 g yoghurt (Greek)
  • 150 g strawberries
  • 4 tbsp xylitol (e.g. Xucker Premium)
  • 2 tbsp sunflower seeds
  • 1 tsp coconut oil (native)
  • 1 pinch vanilla (ground)

Nutritional Values:
  • Carbohydrates 5 g
  • Protein 4 g
  • Fat 9 g

Low Carb Desserts - Yogurt With Strawberries and Sunflower Seeds (low carb)




When most people think of salads, they immediately visualize big, leafy strips of lettuce tossed into a bowl with all sorts of colorful companion vegetables. But there are also those kinds of salads that use deliciously sinful mayonnaise as their chief ingredient. Some of the more popular types of these salads are egg salad, potato salad, chicken salad, and the ever popular (and my personal favorite) seafood salad.

Bacon Avocado Tomato Egg Salad


Probably the easiest and least expensive to make of all mayonnaise based salads is egg salad. Who doesn't have a few extra eggs and mayonnaise in their refrigerator? This salad does a great job at filling a person up with plenty of protein, fat, and calories. An interesting twist to this delightful salad is adding corn, avocado, and crisp bacon. While it may sound a bit odd, the mix tastes out of this world!

The first step is to fry some bacon. Cook four slices of bacon in a shallow pan until crispy. Remove them and place on paper towel covered plate to drain the grease.

Second step is to boil some eggs. Now this may sound easy enough, but chances are you're one of the many people out there that have been over-boiling eggs throughout your entire life! Spread out a single layer of eggs in a pan. Fill with cold water until the eggs are covered by at least an inch of water. Bring the water to a boil and then crank the heat down a bit and simmer the eggs for another two minutes. Finally, turn the heat off, cover the eggs, and let them sit in the hot water for at least twelve minutes. This works with small batches of eggs (6 to 8). Before assuming all the eggs are hard boiled to your liking, you should crack one open and make sure its yolk is cooked enough for your taste. If not, let them cook some more. Once the eggs are done, remove them from the pan and place them inside a bowl of cold water to let them cool off.

After the eggs have cooled, peel them and slice them into small squares. Do the same for the avocados, and then place both eggs and avocados in a large bowl.

In a small bowl, mix the dressing. Add the mayonnaise, mustard, corn (drain it first), curry powder, tomatoes (chopped and diced), and lemon juice together. And don't forget your bacon! Chop the bacon into small pieces and mix into the dressing. Last, pour the dressing into the bowl of chopped eggs and avocado, and then mix everything together.

If you want, you can sprinkle fresh parsley across the salad. And if you're feeling even more indulgent, heat up some flour tortillas and use the salad as a spread. This will serve two to four people.

Ingredients
  • 8 hard boiled eggs, peeled
  • 2 ripe avocados
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 4 slices of bacon
  • 1 tablespoon of Dijon mustard
  • 2 cans of corn kernels (about 20oz total)
  • 1 cup of mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon of curry powder
  • 4 tablespoons of lemon juice
  • 6 flour tortillas

AVOCADO EGG SALAD


RELATED: Easy Breakfast Burrito Recipe

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7504087

Bacon Avocado Tomato Egg Salad




Peanut butter is a very healthy food. Especially when dieting and also for workouts. We are all in a rush with work and families while still trying to fit in exercise that many of us resort to energy and protein bars on a daily basis. Problem is these energy bars are loaded with sugars (even the healthier cane type).

Peanut-Butter-Ground-Flax-Seeds-Energy-Bites-Recipe


Enter peanut butter; this versatile food will fit in with so many healthy endeavors. It's a great snack with apples, or spread on crackers and especially yummy in a peanut butter workout smoothie with added protein powder for recovery.

Did you know that peanuts are not a nut but a member of the legume family which is related to peas, lentils, chickpeas and other beans? Because of this they have many necessary and healthy nutrients like folate which is essential for the structure of our DNA and RNA at the cellular level and is important for our body tissues like bone marrow and the intestinal tract. Folate is also necessary to help the body synthesis and breakdown amino acids. Without folate or folic acid, your body's nervous system and brain function would be affected in negative ways.

Peanut butter also contains vitamin E, an antioxidant, involved in immune function and also aids the heart along with resveratrol. Other nutrients in peanut butter are the mineral zinc, used by your body for repair and the immune system, niacin, protein and manganese. According to the American Peanut Council, "the Nurses' Health Study that involved over 86,000 women, have found that frequent nut consumption is related to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease." This great little bean also contains thiamine (vitamin B1), B6, riboflavin (B2), iron and calcium.

RELATED: What You Should Eat After Your Workout - Post Workout Nutrition

Peanuts are also a contender with fruit as a source of antioxidants because they contain oleic acid, the same fat in olive oil. The research done on peanuts was found to be as loaded with antioxidants as strawberries and blackberries. They also contain more antioxidants than apples and carrots! This I'm sure will be a surprise to many people as it was to me.

Yes peanut butter does contain fat but 80 percent is good fat which can help you lower LDL cholesterol (the lousy cholesterol). Fat none-the-less is a critical nutrient needed for brain function and for moving fat soluble vitamins where your body needs them like the skin.

Peanut Butter Ground Flax Seeds Energy Bites Recipe


Peanut Butter Energy Bites Recipe


Ingredients

  • 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
  • ⅔ cup creamy peanut butter
  • ½ cup ground flax seeds
  • 1/4 cup chocolate chips
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 tablespoons honey

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in a large bowl and stir together well to combine.
  2. Place bowl of "dough" in the fridge for 30 minutes to an hour so it can set up.
  3. Bring dough out of the fridge and roll into balls about 1 Tablespoon in size.
  4. Store in a covered container in the fridge.

Peanut Butter Ground Flax Seeds Energy Bites Recipe




We make these easy healthy breakfast burritos for breakfast and for supper. They are full of protein and taste great any time of the day. This recipe is versatile, and you can add any ingredient that is your favorite. It makes great leftovers for lunches the next day, saving you time and money.

Easy Breakfast Burrito Recipe


Here is a simple breakfast burrito recipe


Ingredients

Servings: 2

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cooking Time: 10 minutes

  • 2 medium Tomato, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons Tomato ketchup
  • 2 medium Spring Onions, finely chopped
  • 100g Mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cube(s) Vegetable stock cube(s), vegetable, made up with 150ml hot water
  • 1⁄2 teaspoons Black pepper
  • 1 spray(s) Calorie controlled cooking spray
  • 3 medium, raw Egg, whole, raw
  • 2 tablespoons Skimmed Milk
  • 2 medium Tortilla wrap(s)
  • 1 pinch Salt, to taste


Instructions

Step 1

First make the salsa by mixing together the tomatoes, tomato ketchup and spring onions. Set aside

Step 2

Next, simmer the mushrooms and vegetable stock in a saucepan for about 3 – 4 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Step 3

Meanwhile, spray a medium non-stick saucepan with low fat cooking spray. Beat the eggs and milk together and season with salt and pepper. Add to the saucepan and scramble the eggs over a medium heat until just set. Remove from the heat.

Step 4

Warm the tortillas in a hot frying pan, one at a time, flipping them over after a few seconds.

Step 5

Lay the tortillas on two separate serving plates and fill the centre with scrambled eggs and well-drained mushrooms. Fold up one edge of each tortilla to form the base, then fold in the sides to form pockets. Serve with the tomato salsa.

Step 6

Cook’s tips: For extra flavor, stir a couple of snipped grilled turkey rashers into the scrambled eggs. This will add 1/2 Point per serving. If you like, add some chopped fresh herbs to the salsa, such as coriander or parsley.

RELATED:  4 Healthy Breakfast Recipes for Weight Loss

Source

Easy Breakfast Burrito Recipe




If there’s one thing we know you’re not eating enough of, it’s produce. Any way that you can figure to get more fruit, nuts, and leafy green vegetables into you life, do it. More and more research is showing that the primary cause of fat gain in American may not be too many calories it may be a lack of nutrients, caused by our packaged and processed diets. Salads may not seem particularly macho. But neither are man boobs.

5 Healthy Salad Recipes for Fat Loss and Muscle-Building


1. Tuna-stuffed Avocado

Ingredients

  • 1 avocado
  • 3 oz can tuna, drained
  • ½ cup bell pepper, diced
  • ½ cup red onion, diced
  • ½ cup cucumber, diced
  • ⅓ cup low-fat, plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • ½ cup fresh orange segments, diced
Directions

  1. Slice avocado in half vertically. Remove pit and scoop out flesh, leaving about ¼ inch all around.
  2. Put the scooped out fruit in a bowl with tuna, bell pepper, onion, cucumber, yogurt, and lemon juice. Mix with a spoon.
  3. Add orange to bowl and mix gently. Distribute mixture between avocado halves and serve.

Tuna-stuffed Avocado


Makes 1 serving

Per serving:
• 538 calories • 33 g protein
• 32 g carbs • 34 g fat


2. Calamari Salad

Calamari Salad


Ingredients

  • 1 lb calamari, sliced
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Garlic powder
Dressing

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • ½ cup olives
  • 1 spritz lemon
  • 1 spritz lime Parsley for garnish
Directions

For the salad:
  1. Coat calamari with oil and season to taste with spices.
  2. Add to a skillet and cook over medium heat until squid turns opaque.

For the dressing:
  1. Add all ingredients to a shaker cup and shake until mixed well.
  2. Drain dressing over cooked squid and serve.
Makes 4 servings

Per serving:
• 214 calories • 18 g protein
• 5 g carbs • 14 g fat





3. Sweet Potato Crab Salad

Sweet Potato Crab Salad


Ingredients

  • ½ cup English cucumbers, diced
  • 1 tbsp plus ¼ Feta cheese, crumbled
  • 4 oz white balsamic vinegar
  • 4 oz sweet potato puree
  • 1 tbsp Sriracha or Thai chili paste
  • 2 tbsp light corn syrup
  • 1 tbsp salt and pepper blend
  • 1 cup tomatoes, diced
  • 12 mint leaves, julienned
  • 1 cup 80/20 blended oil
  • (80% vegetable oil, 20% olive oil)
  • 2 lb jumbo lump crab meat

Directions

  1. Blend cucumbers, 1 tbsp Feta, vinegar, sweet potato puree, Sriracha, corn syrup, and salt and pepper in a food processor, and puree until smooth.
  2. Pour mixture through either a chamois cloth or cheesecloth and return to food processor while slowly adding oil until smooth.
  3. Mix tomatoes, remaining Feta, and mint into a bowl. Add 1 cup of dressing to salad, mix, then add crab and toss to coat crab. Be sure not to break up crabmeat; you want to leave as many lumps as possible.

Makes 4 servings

Per serving:
• 837 calories • 49 g protein
• 19 g carbs • 63 g fat


4. Pineapple-Grilled Shrimp Salad

Pineapple-Grilled Shrimp Salad


Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp high-quality tequila
  • 1 tsp agave nectar or honey
  • 2 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 lb large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 cups pineapple, sliced into 1” triangles
For the Salad

  • 6 cups dark, leafy mixed greens
  • ½ cup roasted red peppers, thinly sliced
  • 1 ripe avocado, halved and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup toasted pine nuts

For the Dressing

  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp high-quality tequila
  • 2 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp orange juice
  • 2 tbsp lime juice
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp chili flakes

Directions

  1. Combine and whisk marinade ingredients. Add shrimp and pineapple. Toss to coat. Cover and leave in fridge for 30 mins.
  2. Grill marinated shrimp and pineapple (or saute in a skillet over medium) until shrimp is done.
  3. Combine and whisk dressing ingredients. Add greens and peppers. Toss. Top with shrimp, pineapple, avocado, and pine nuts.

Makes 4 servings

Per serving:
• 498 calories • 28 g protein
• 25 g carbs • 30 g fat


5. Brussels, Bacon, Burst Tomato & Feta Salad

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cups grape tomatoes
  • 2 cups Brussels sprouts leaves
  • ¼ cup Craisins, soaked in hot water and drained
  • ¼ cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp Kosher salt
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • ¼ cup red onion, julienned
  • ⅓ cup 80/20 blended oil/grape-seed oil
  • 1 cup Feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1 cup bacon, julienned

Directions

  1. Bring oil to a simmer in a pan over medium-high heat, then add tomatoes, tossing and cooking until skin bursts. Once burst, remove from heat and hold for salad.
  2. Next, bring 6 cups salted water to a boil, then add leaves and stir, cooking for 1-2 minutes. Once cooked, remove from water and allow to air cool.
  3. In a food processor combine Craisins, vinegar, salt, mustard, and onion, then puree. Slowly add oil. Once blended, taste and season, then remove.
  4. To finish salad, mix all ingredients in large bowl, add ½ cup dressing and toss well to coat salad. Plate, top with Feta and bacon, and serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings

Per serving:
• 481 calories • 11 g protein
• 24 g carbs • 39 g fat 

5 Healthy Salad Recipes for Fat Loss and Muscle-Building




Kiwi is known around the world as the exotic fruit offers several varieties, with the most common type of kiwi, the Zhong Hua, is sold in grocery stores. The Zhong Hua has a brown exterior with a hair like texture, the inside of the Zhong Hua, can be green in color, greenish yellow, or yellow. The Jing li is an oval shaped kiwi that contains a green interior. The Ruan Zoa is a small kiwi with a green interior, and the Moa Hua is a sweeter version of kiwi. Calories in a kiwi depend on the size of the kiwi.

How Many Calories in a Kiwi


Kiwi - 46 calories or (76.0g.) caloric content for a kiwi without the skin.
Kiwi - 56 calories or (91.0g.) caloric content for a large kiwi without the skin.
Kiwi - 108 calories or (177.0g) caloric content per 1 cup serving. Kiwi is also known as Chinese goose berries.

Nutrition Facts

The nutritional value in kiwi is extensive with vitamins C and E, folic acid. Kiwi contains essential minerals such as calcium, chromium, iron, potassium and zinc. Calories in a kiwi are low, offering a healthy alternative snack for those who are trying to lose weight.


RELATED: Top 5 Fruits to Eat to Lose Weight Quickly


Health Benefits

Vitamin C found in Kiwi, is known for building a strong immune system, and assists with the absorption of iron, and has long been thought to prevent certain types of cancer. Vitamin E found in kiwi offers health benefits that include protection against heart disease. Vitamin E is known for preventing the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines and promotes healthier skin for those who have problems with dry skin and chaffing. Folic acid, found in the kiwi offers health benefits that include a healthy production of red blood cells. Folic acid is an important nutrient for expectant mothers as well as infants. Calcium found in kiwi offers health benefits related to bone health. Calcium is often recommended for women who are at risk for osteoporosis. Calcium has been known to help lower blood pressure, as well as reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. Calcium is believed to reduce the occurrence of kidney stones. Studies reveal that dieters who lose and maintain their weight have a higher calcium intake. Calories in a kiwi are low. Kiwi is full of nutritious vitamins and minerals making the kiwi a healthy food choice for those who wish to lose weight.

How to Store

In order to ripen kiwi fast keep them in a brown paper bag with an apple, pear or banana at room temperature. For a more gradual ripening keep ripe and unripe kiwi in the refrigerator. Refrigerate no longer than one to two weeks.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Amy_Sue_Miller/838122

How Many Calories in a Kiwi




Vegetarian meals are another great choice for healthy, reduced calorie eating. They are naturally low in fats in general and saturated fats in particular. This makes it easy to achieve that high nutrient, low calorie balance that we are looking for. They also offer a tremendous variety of flavors, adding variety to your mega meal plan. We try to have at least one vegetarian dinner a week, and I often eat meatless lunches.

400 Calorie Vegetarian Dinners - Slimming Vegetarian Recipes


1. Meal in a Potato

You’ll really get your veggies in this recipe. And you’ll also get so much taste and volume that you won’t even think about the fact that it is meatless.

  • 1 pound (455 g) cauliflower florets, steamed until crisp-tender
  • 1 pound (455 g) broccoli florets, steamed until crisp-tender
  • 1 cup (160 g) onion, steamed until crisp-tender
  • 1 cup (150 g) red bell pepper, steamed until crisp-tender
  • 4 large potatoes, baked
  • 1 cup (110 g) low fat Swiss cheese

Steam vegetables. Cook potatoes in oven or microwave until done. Split and top with hot vegetables. Sprinkle with cheese.

4 SERVINGS

Each with: 408 Calories (6% from Fat, 19% from Protein, 74% from Carb); 21 g Protein; 3 g Total Fat; 1 g Saturated Fat; 1 g Monounsaturated Fat; 1 g Polyunsaturated Fat; 80 g Carb; 13 g Fiber; 10 g Sugar; 451 mg Phosphorus; 424 mg Calcium; 157 mg Sodium; 1675 mg Potassium; 1988 IU Vitamin A; 13 mg ATE Vitamin E; 247 mg Vitamin C; 12 mg Cholesterol


2. A Little Different Stuffed Pepper

400 Calorie Vegetarian Dinners - Stuffed Pepper


Peas and carrots, as well as finely chopped walnuts, give these stuffed peppers not only a nutritional boost, but a flavor boost as well.

  • 4 green bell peppers
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
  • 1 cup (160 g) onion, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 cup (61 g) carrot, julienned
  • 1 cup (150 g) peas, fresh or frozen
  • 1 cup (180 g) tomato, diced
  • 1/3 cup (40 g) walnuts, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups (293 g) brown rice, cooked
  • 2 cups (490 g) low sodium spaghetti sauce

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Wash and clean green bell peppers. Cut off tops and remove seeds and membrane. Steam peppers 3 to 4 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat oil in wok or large skillet and add onion and garlic. Sauté 1 minute. Add herbs, carrot, and peas. Continue to cook 3 to 5 minutes or until carrots are tender, stirring constantly. Reduce heat and add the tomato, walnuts, brown rice, and 1/2 cup (123 g) tomato sauce. Heat through. Stuff mixture into peppers. Spread 1/2 cup (123 g) sauce in bottom of baking dish. Stand peppers upright. Pour remaining sauce over the tops of peppers. Bake in oven for 30 minutes.

4 SERVINGS

Each with: 405 Calories (35% from Fat, 10% from Protein, 55% from Carb); 11 g Protein; 17 g Total Fat; 2 g Unsaturated Fat; 8 g Monounsaturated Fat; 5 g Polyunsaturated Fat; 58 g Carb; 12 g Fiber; 22 g Sugar; 248 mg Phosphorus; 99 mg Calcium; 186 mg Sodium; 1129 mg Potassium; 3861 IU Vitamin A; 0 mg ATE Vitamin E; 147 mg Vitamin C; 0 mg Cholesterol

3. Marinated Vegetable Salad

This hearty salad is a full meal. It’s full of beans and cheese for protein, as well as a generous helping of lots of vegetables, and is the perfect meal for a warm evening.

  • 4 cups (360 g) red cabbage, shredded
  • 4 cups (440 g) carrot, shredded
  • 2 cups (512 g) kidney beans, drained
  • 2 cups (200 g) green beans, cooked and cooled
  • 2 cups (480 g) chickpeas, drained
  • 32 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/3 cup (8 g) sugar substitute, such as Splenda
  • 1/3 cup (60 ml) olive oil
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup (40 g) onion, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups (173 g) low fat cheddar cheese, shredded

In a 2 1/2-quart (2.4 L) bowl, place a layer of cabbage, carrot, kidney beans, green beans, chickpeas, and tomatoes. In a jar with tight lid, place sugar substitute, oil, vinegar, and onion. Cover and shake until well mixed. Pour over vegetables. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 4 hours to marinate vegetables. Top with cheese before serving.

6 SERVINGS

Each with: 415 Calories (34% from Fat, 20% from Protein, 46% from Carb); 21 g Protein; 16 g Total Fat; 3 g Unsaturated Fat; 10 g Monounsaturated Fat; 2 g Polyunsaturated Fat; 50 g Carb; 16 g Fiber; 11 g Sugar; 398 mg Phosphorus; 278 mg Calcium; 286 mg Sodium; 1153 mg Potassium; 11 836 IU Vitamin A; 20 mg ATE Vitamin E; 64 mg Vitamin C; 7 mg Cholesterol



4. Great Grilled Vegetable Meal

400 Calorie Vegetarian Dinners - Great Grilled Vegetable Meal


Grilled vegetables are teamed with tomatoes and fresh mozzarella for a warm salad that is perfect for warm weather.

  • 4 red bell peppers
  • 8 Japanese eggplants
  • 2 heads radicchio
  • 2 bulbs fennel
  • 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil
  • 4 medium tomatoes, sliced
  • 8 ounces (225 g) fresh mozzarella
  • 2 tablespoons (28 ml) balsamic vinegar

Tip: You can substitute other vegetables like onions and zucchini.

Heat a grill and place the red bell peppers on to cook. Grill until the skin of the peppers is blackened and appears blistered. Remove peppers from the grill and place in a brown paper bag. Roll bag up and allow to set for about 10 minutes in order to enhance flavor. Split the eggplant, radicchio, and fennel in halves; brush radicchio, fennel, and fleshy parts of eggplant with a bit of the olive oil. Place eggplant, radicchio, and fennel on the grill and grill until done, about 8 to 10 minutes. While vegetables are grilling, peel the peppers by placing under cold water and scraping the blistered skin off. It should come off easily. Divide the grilled vegetables among 4 plates. Add slices of the fresh tomatoes and cheese. Drizzle with vinegar.

4 SERVINGS

Each with: 394 Calories (37% from Fat, 20% from Protein, 43% from Carb); 22 g Protein; 18 g Total Fat; 7 g Unsaturated Fat; 8 g Monounsaturated Fat; 2 g Polyunsaturated Fat; 46 g Carb; 18 g Fiber; 11 g Sugar; 508 mg Phosphorus; 595 mg Calcium; 498 mg Sodium; 2137 mg Potassium; 6225 IU Vitamin A; 70 mg ATE Vitamin E; 356 mg Vitamin C; 36 mg Cholesterol


RELATED: Cucumber Salad Recipes


5. Eggplant Zucchini Casserole

Eggplant Zucchini Casserole - 400 Calorie Vegetarian Dinners


Called it baked spaghetti, vegetable lasagna, or whatever you want, this vegetarian dish is healthy, tasty, and filling. Spaghetti teams with vegetables, primarily eggplant and zucchini, in an Italian-style baked casserole.

  • 1 medium eggplant, peeled and sliced
  • 2 cups (240 g) zucchini, sliced
  • 28 ounces (758 g) low sodium spaghetti sauce
  • 1/2 cup (50 g) celery, chopped
  • 1 cup (150 g) green bell pepper, chopped
  • 8 ounces (225 g) part skim mozzarella, grated
  • 8 ounces (225 g) whole wheat spaghetti, broken into 1-inch (2.5 cm) pieces

Layer 1/2 eggplant slices in greased 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33 cm) baking dish, then 1/2 zucchini, then 1/2 spaghetti, 1/2 celery, and green bell pepper. Sprinkle with 1/2 cheese and 1/2 spaghetti sauce. Repeat layers. Bake, covered, at 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4) for 1 1/2 hours.

6 SERVINGS

Each with: 403 Calories (28% from Fat, 18% from Protein, 54% from Carb); 19 g Protein; 13 g Total Fat; 5 g Unsaturated Fat; 6 g Monounsaturated Fat; 1 g Polyunsaturated Fat; 58 g Carb; 11 g Fiber; 19 g Sugar; 362 mg Phosphorus; 367 mg Calcium; 291 mg Sodium; 974 mg Potassium; 1234 IU Vitamin A; 47 mg ATE Vitamin E; 44 mg Vitamin C; 24 mg Cholesterol

RELATED: 5 Delicious Fat Burning Juices Recipes That Boost Metabolism

400 Calorie Vegetarian Dinners - Slimming Vegetarian Recipes




Juicing has become exceptionally popular with those looking to lose weight. Many fruits and vegetables contain minerals that aid in burning fat. Juicing is undoubtedly the way to go considering that cooking foods destroys some of their micronutrients. Processed foods usually lack some of their micronutrients too. In order to get the maximum nutrition value from your fruits and vegetables, juicing is the best option as well as buying only organic products when able. Juicing also helps you get your daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables in your diet easily. These juices are not only effective in burning fat but are tasty!

5 Delicious Fat Burning Juices Recipes That Boost Metabolism


Making your own juices is certainly something worth trying; but how do you make them? No worries, we’ve got you covered. We’ve gathered up 5 delicious fat burning fruit juice recipes to help get you started.

1. Papaya Passion

This tropical flavored juice is loaded with vitamin C, which plays a big role in weight loss. Papayas also contain papain, an enzyme that helps with digestion and contributes to the breaking down of proteins.

Fat Burning Papaya Juice


Ingredients
  • 1 medium papaya
  • 1 red apple
  • 5 pitted dates

Directions

Remove stem from apple and papaya if applicable. Place all three ingredients in a blender.

Blend well and serve fresh


2. Tropical Green Tea Power

This juice is great for energy and is protein-rich. Green tea is a powerful antioxidant. Flax seeds contain omega. Bananas and mangos are rich in fiber and vitamins.

Ingredients
  • ½ peeled banana
  • ½ cup mango chunks
  • 1 cup peach juice
  • 1 tbsp. ground flax seeds
  • 1 tbsp. green tea powder

Directions

Place all ingredients in a blender. Blend and serve fresh


3. Orange Grapefruit Juice

Fat Burning Orange Grapefruit Juice


This juice promotes weight loss. Grapefruit is high in fat burning enzymes. Scientific studies have shown many positive connections between drinking grapefruit and weight loss.

Ingredients
  • 3 oranges
  • 1 grapefruit

Directions

Peel the oranges and grapefruit. Place all ingredients in a blender

Blend and serve fresh


4. Slim Me Juice

This juice is excellent for weight loss. It boosts metabolism and increases stamina during exercise.

Ingredients
  • 1 apple
  • 4-5 raspberries
  • 1 kiwifruit
  • 1 banana
  • 4 almonds

Directions

Remove stem from apple. Peel banana. Place all ingredients in a blender

Blend and serve fresh


5. Watermelon Juice

Watermelon Juice


This delicious juice is perfect for burning fat. Watermelon contains arginine. Arginine is an amino acid that both prevents the storing of fat and burns it.

Ingredients
  • ½ of a seedless watermelon
  • ½ cup of coconut water
  • 1 lime
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper

Directions

Peel and chop up watermelon into chunks. Place the seedless watermelon, coconut water and cayenne pepper in a blender.

Cut the lime in half. Squeeze the juice from one half of the lime into the blender.

Blend well and serve fresh


5 Delicious Fat Burning Juices Recipes That Boost Metabolism

RELATED: The Top 10 Most Powerful Weight Loss Juice Recipes

5 Delicious Fat Burning Juices Recipes That Boost Metabolism




Billions and billions of dollars. That's what the weight loss industry makes on a yearly basis! And because of this, companies will most certainly go above and beyond to get their fair share of the profits.

10 Lies You've Been Told About Losing Weight Fast


That's good for them... and BAD for us dieters looking to lose weight and get in shape!

The reason it's bad is simply because their primary focus shifts from wanting to genuinely help people... to solely focusing on their bottom lines. One of the methods they use is by putting out false information in the hopes of persuading people into buying their next "best thing".

Listen, losing weight fast and getting great results can be done. However, falling into the traps set by these money grubbing weight loss companies will only send you down a path of no results... and possibly even worst.

To avoid getting caught into this trap, I have for you below 10 common lies told to you about getting fast results... and what you should do instead...

1. Pop some diet pills...

Taking diet pills is a dangerous route to travel down... and I highly recommend you take a detour or avoid it all together. Not only do diet pills have harmful ingredients in them that can do some serious damage to your body, they are also overpriced, and to put salt on the wound... they primarily reduce water weight... which is bound to come right back on!

2. All you need to do is detox...

Now yes, you should do things to help cleanse your digestive system, colon, and total body. Our bodies have a TON of toxins and waste in them that is making us sick, fat, and dying way too young. However, strictly doing JUST a detox is not a good idea. You still have to do all the other necessary tasks for losing weight and improving your overall health.

3. You need to completely cut out carbs...

Doing this will cause some serious issues with your digestive system and your energy levels... plus more. Now granted, it is imperative that you significantly reduce your simple carb intake (such as white flour foods, sugar, etc.), however, it is important that you get a healthy amount of COMPLEX carbs everyday (such as foods high in fiber). This will help your digestive system... which in turn helps your metabolism... which in turn helps you lose pounds of body fat... and more.


RELATED: Low Carb Diets - Carb Concepts



4. You need to completely cut out fats...

The only type of fats I recommend you cut out are saturated and trans fats. With that said, I do recommend you get healthy fats in your diet (better known as monounsaturated fat and omega fatty acids). Getting high quality foods with healthy fats (such as nuts, olive oil, and more) will most certainly help you with weight loss, fat loss, and improving your overall health (such as heart health and improving your joints).

5. You should significantly reduce your calorie intake...

This will make you miserable, it will reduce your metabolism, it will make you lose muscle tissue, and so much more. You should only reduce your calorie intake by just a couple of hundred calories, and utilize fitness as the primary tool for minimizing your calories.

6. You have to do high intensity workouts everyday...

In theory, you would think that doing super intense cardio workouts that will make you sweat your butt off will do wonders for your body and will cause you to lose a ton of weight fast... and it will... however, doing so will cause 2 issues to happen that will pretty much make it foolish to follow this advice...

These other issues are you will more than likely get injured or your body will reach a plateau. Bottom line, just as important as it is to workout, is just as important that you give your body rest. When you rest, you allow your body to recover, your muscles will grow, you'll restore energy, and you'll least likely hit a plateau.

7. Skipping meals will make you skinny...

FYI: Skipping meals won’t do your body any favors. For one, skipping meals causes your blood sugar to drop, as mentioned by Women’s Health. When this happens, you’ll notice a slump in your mood, a drop in energy, and you might have trouble thinking clearly. If you keep it up, your body will eventually be forced to start breaking down muscle for fuel. This will take a toll on your metabolism, ultimately leaving you worse off. You’re better off sticking with regular meals filled with foods that will keep you energized. Think protein, produce, and whole grains.


8. Cut back on how much water you drink...

Those that say you should cut back on how much water you drink say this because water is heavy... and if you drink a lot of it, it adds on to your weight?! Please excuse for one moment while I try to stop myself from laughing so hard!

Drinking the recommended amount of water (1/2 your body weight in ounces) throughout the day WILL NOT MAKE YOU GAIN WEIGHT! Our bodies are primarily made up of water... and our bodies desire water more than anything. When you start drinking more water, you'll lose stored water weight, you'll improve your digestive system, you'll help your metabolism, and so much more.

9. You can’t ever eat out...

Just because you’re trying to lose weight, doesn’t mean you have to give up your favorite restaurants. Healthy living is about making good choices. If you’re eating at a restaurant, opt for grilled instead of fried foods, ask for dressing on the side, and go for water instead of sugary drinks. It’s also smart to look at the menu ahead of time, that way you know what options will be available to you. This can also take away the stress from having to choose later on.

10. Eating healthy is boring...

Eating healthy doesn’t mean having just veggies and lean protein 24/7. While they should be staples in your diet if you’re trying to lose weight, there’s a whole world of other options out there that taste fantastic. From sandwiches and soups to snacks and dessert (yes, nutritious desserts do exist), you’d be surprised at just how delicious healthy foods can be. Obviously, that’s a lot to keep your taste buds happy.

And there’s more. Lack of sleep could hurt your weight-loss efforts, too. The Huffington Post says sleep deprivation causes an increase in cortisol, the stress hormone that can boost your appetite for sugary and fatty foods.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Avy_Barnes/169895

10 Lies You've Been Told About Losing Weight Fast




Why is protein important?

Foods high in protein help to keep you full.

Protein is really important for another reason: It’s the building block of muscle. Your body uses it to help repair all of those muscle fibers you’ve just damaged lifting weights. If you don’t get enough protein, not only will your body be unable to build muscle, but it will eventually do the opposite, breaking down muscle to fuel itself, and you definitely don’t want that. You can work your butt off in the gym, but if you don’t give the body the fuel it needs, you won’t see the results you want. It’s quid pro quo: give your body what it wants, and it will return the favor.

Top 10 High-Protein Foods


There’s some debate about exactly how much protein you need. Some experts recommend one gram for every pound of your body weight. This can be a lot, though, especially if you’re trying to lose weight. Supertrainer Noah recommends 20–30 grams per meal, which is very doable.

Another aspect of protein is that it cannot be stored in your body, like carbohydrates and fat, so once it runs low there are no reserves for your body to take from. Experts state you need at least 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. Below are some excellent sources of protein.

Top 10 High-Protein Foods



1. Eggs

Eggs and Milk - Protein FoodsThe most natural, and best muscle building food available. They are filled with not only proteins, but also vitamins and other minerals your body requires for overall development.

2. Milk 

Is not only a decent muscle building source, but also has lots of amino acids that are essential for muscle growth. In addition to this, milk is also highly nutritious with its high levels of vitamins, calcium and minerals. So if you manage to eat a 6 ounce steak, and a glass of whole milk, your body receives 11 grams of protein in a single meal.


RELATED: How to Make a High Protein Breakfast


3. Beef

Lean beef protein is around 21g per 100g. If you're not sure whether to go for red meat or white, choose a combination of the two:

4. Beef liver

Beef again, but this time in the form of liver. This is a another great source of protein: 19,4g / 100g. A good option to add not only for proteins, but also for adding folic acid, iron and zinc to your diet.
Chicken Breast

5. Chicken or turkey breast 

Chicken is another great protein source that comprises mainly of lean, white chicken meat. It has minimal fat with lots of vitamin B6, which ensures optimum heart protection.

6. Seafoods such as prawns

Seafood is always a good source of animal protein, and specifically the prawns coming in at 24g of protein with only 0.8 grams of fat and a tiny 100kcal per 100g of food. A perfect choice for dieters.

7. Soybeans

Protein is not just or the meat eaters. Soybeans are legume that have more protein and less carbohydrate. Among the vegetable protein content is 3 0g per 100g of product.

You can also choose products like Tofu or Quinoa as a vegetable protein source. And there are nuts such as almonds and pistachios which have 20 g of protein along with a healthy dose of omega 3.

8. Salted cod

The protein content of fresh cod is considerable (around 20g) but the salted cod is a real protein concentrate with a contribution of 75g per 100g. A small portion of salted cod is sufficient to meet your daily needs for protein.
Fresh Tuna

9. Fresh tuna

Fresh tuna is another animal protein source that provides 21,5g of protein per 100g. Similar to those of other fish such as salmon, halibut or sea bass, these endless sources of protein can bring diversity to your dishes.

10. Gelatine

Gelatine is the star regarding food protein percentage. 100g of gelatin containing no less than about 84g protein. There are plenty of commercial varieties of gelatin, so it's important to look at the packets nutritional information to choose the right option for you.


RELATED: High Protein Foods List for Weight Loss


Always remember your caloric intake when choosing your protein and remember balance is key.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Abi_Diribe/1996841

Top 10 High-Protein Foods




First let’s define exactly what we mean by heart-healthy recipes and how this collection is different from other recipes you may have or have seen. Heart-healthy diets are aimed at preventing or reducing a number of risk factors that can lead to heart attacks and heart disease. Among the more important ones are coronary artery disease, high cholesterol and high blood pressure.
The American Heart Association lists seven key items for maintaining cardiovascular health. They are:

  • Don’t smoke
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Engage in regular physical activity
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Manage blood pressure
  • Take charge of cholesterol
  • Keep blood sugar, or glucose, at healthy levels.

35 Easy Heart Healthy Recipes


You can easily see that while they list diet as a separate factor, what you eat affects everything on the list except smoking and exercise. If you start digging into the details of dietary recommendations for staying a healthy weight, maintaining a healthy blood pressure and cholesterol level, and managing blood sugar levels you immediately find that the same recommendations are key to many or all of them. Common themes at such diverse web sites as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the American Heart Association, the Mayo Clinic and WebMD include:

  • Limit the amount of unhealthy fats such as saturated fats and trans fats that you eat
  • Choose lean sources of protein
  • Eat more whole grains
  • East more fruits and vegetables
  • Limit your sodium intake
  • Limit your cholesterol intake.

Why Is Heart-Healthy Cooking Important?


According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States among both men and women. A few statistics from their website show:

  • In 2008, over 616,000 people died of heart disease, almost 25% of deaths in the United States.
  • In that same year, 405,309 people died from coronary heart disease.
  • Every year about 785,000 Americans have a first coronary attack. Another 470,000 who have already had one or more coronary attacks have another attack.
  • In 2010, coronary heart disease alone was projected to cost the United States $108.9 billion. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.
  • More than 27 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with heart disease.

Clearly heart health is a major problem. Statistics in other parts of the world vary, but in many countries heart disease is also the number one cause of death.

35 Easy Heart Healthy Recipes:


1. Vegetable Omelet

Vegetable Omelet


This can be either a breakfast or the main part of an evening meal.

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
2 ounces (55 g) mushrooms, sliced
1/4 cup (40 g) onion, diced
1/4 cup (37 g) green bell peppers, diced
1/4 cup (28 g) zucchini, sliced
1/2 cup (90 g) tomato, diced
4 eggs
2 tablespoons (30 g) fat-free sour cream
2 tablespoons (30 ml) water
2 ounces (55 g) Swiss cheese, shredded

Add olive oil to a large skillet and sauté mushrooms, onion, green bell pepper, zucchini, and tomato until soft, adding tomato last. Whisk together eggs, sour cream, and water until fluffy. Coat an omelet pan or skillet with nonstick vegetable spray and place over medium-high heat. Pour egg mixture into pan. Lift the edges as it cooks to allow uncooked egg to run underneath. When eggs are nearly set, cover half the eggs with the cheese and sautéed vegetables and fold the other half over. Continue cooking until eggs are completely set.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 263 calories (46% from fat, 41% from protein, 13% from carbohydrate); 25 g protein; 13 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 6 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 8 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 386 mg phosphorus; 369 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 309 mg sodium; 246 mg potassium; 962 IU vitamin A; 6 mg ATE vitamin E; 25 mg vitamin C; 395 mg cholesterol; 259 g water


2. Cinnamon Apple Omelet

Cinnamon Apple Omelet


A little different version of an omelet. I remember years ago there were often recipes for omelets with jelly or other sweet fillings, but you don’t see them much any more. This one makes me think they are still a good idea.

1 tablespoon unsalted butter, divided
1 apple, peeled and sliced thin
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon (15 g) brown sugar
3 eggs
1 tablespoon cream
1 tablespoon sour cream

Melt 2 teaspoons butter in egg pan. Add apple, cinnamon, and brown sugar. Sauté until tender. Set aside. Whip eggs and cream until fluffy; set aside. Clean egg pan. Melt remaining butter, pour in egg mixture. Cook as you would for an omelet. When eggs are ready to flip, turn them, then add to the center of the eggs the sour cream and on top of that the apple mixture. Fold it onto a plate.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 129 g water; 252 calories (57% from fat, 17% from protein, 25% from carb); 11 g protein; 16 g total fat; 8 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 16 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 14 g sugar; 181 mg phosphorus; 73 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 126 mg sodium; 211 mg potassium; 695 IU vitamin A; 187 mg vitamin E; 3 mg vitamin C; 379 mg cholesterol


RELATED: 4 Healthy Breakfast Recipes for Weight Loss


3. Spinach Pie

Spinach Pie


A great breakfast idea, but also a great side dish to go with chicken, turkey, or beef.

10 ounces (280 g) frozen spinach
6 eggs, stirred
2 cups (450 g) cottage cheese
1/4 cup (55 g) unsalted butter, melted
6 tablespoons (48 g) flour
10 ounces (283 g) Cheddar cheese, cut into cubes

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, gas mark 4). Cook spinach according to package directions; drain thoroughly and squeeze dry. Mix all ingredients together in a 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33-cm) pan. Bake for 1 hour.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 143 g water; 423 calories (62% from fat, 28% from protein, 10% from carb); 30 g protein; 29 g total fat; 17 g saturated fat; 9 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 10 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 433 mg phosphorus; 462 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 425 mg sodium; 290 mg potassium; 6696 IU vitamin A; 268 mg vitamin E; 1 mg vitamin C; 310 mg cholesterol


4. Grilled Marinated Chicken Breasts

Grilled Marinated Chicken Breasts


These thin grilled chicken breasts make great sandwiches. They are also good sliced on top of a salad or stirred into a pasta salad.

1/4 cup (60 ml) olive oil
1/4 cup (60 ml) red wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) minced garlic
1 teaspoon (3 g) onion powder
1 1/2 teaspoons (1 g) Italian seasoning
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried thyme
2 boneless chicken breasts

Combine all ingredients except chicken in a resealable plastic bag and mix well. Slice breasts in half crosswise, making two thin fillets from each. Add the chicken to the bag, seal, and marinate for at least 2 hours, turning occasionally. Remove chicken from marinade and grill over medium heat until done, turning once.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 165 calories (77% from fat, 20% from protein, 2% from carbohydrate); 8 g protein; 14 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 10 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 1 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 74 mg phosphorus; 16 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 25 mg sodium; 110 mg potassium; 38 IU vitamin A; 2 mg ATE vitamin E; 1 mg vitamin C; 21 mg cholesterol; 41 g water



5. Lemon Thyme Chicken

Lemon and honey add a sort of sweet and sour flavor to these grilled chicken breasts.

1/4 cup honey
1 tablespoon lemon peel, grated
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
4 boneless skinless chicken breasts

Heat grill to medium heat. Combine honey, lemon peel, lemon juice, thyme, and pepper. Grill chicken until no longer pink in the center, about 15–20 minutes. Brush with sauce during the last 10 minutes.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 145 calories (6% from fat, 45% from protein, 50% from carb); 17 g protein ; 1 g total fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 18 g carb; 0 g fiber; 18 g sugar; 141 mg phosphorus; 14 mg calcium; 47 mg sodium; 202 mg potassium; 21 IU vitamin A; 4 mg ATE vitamin E; 5 mg vitamin C; 41 mg cholesterol


6. Beef Barley Skillet

A tasty and healthy family meal that cooks in one pan.

3/4 pound (338 g) ground beef
1/2 cup (80 g) chopped onion
1/4 cup (38 g) chopped green bell pepper
1/4 cup (25 g) chopped celery
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 cups (480 g) no-salt-added canned tomatoes, broken up
1 1/2 cups (355 ml) water
3/4 cup (150 g) pearl barley

Sauté meat, onion, green pepper, and celery in nonstick fry pan. Drain off excess fat; stir in remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer; cover and cook about 1 hour.

Yield: 3 servings

Per serving: 389 g water; 477 calories (21% from fat, 31% from protein, 48% from carb); 29 g protein; 9 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 45 g carbohydrate; 10 g fiber; 7 g sugar; 326 mg phosphorus; 90 mg calcium; 6 mg iron; 129 mg sodium; 932 mg potassium; 292 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 30 mg vitamin C; 78 mg cholesterol


7. Brisket of Beef with Beans

Kind of like baked beans with the addition of the beef. The cooking liquid gives the beef a nice flavor, and the beans go well with it.

1 pound (455 g) navy beans
2 pound (900 g) beef brisket
2 slices bacon
1/2 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
2 cups (475 ml) water
1/4 cup (60 ml) maple syrup
1/2 cup (115 g) packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

Soak beans in water overnight. Drain the beans. Brown the fat side of the brisket in a Dutch oven or heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and brown the other side. Add the pepper, water, and beans. Reduce heat to medium and cook, covered, for 2 hours or until the beef and beans are tender, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. Remove the beef and keep warm. Add the maple syrup, brown sugar, and mustard to the beans. Mix thoroughly, and simmer over medium heat for another 10 minutes. Slice the brisket thinly and serve with the beans.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 221 g water; 644 calories (49% from fat, 22% from protein, 29% from carb); 35 g protein; 35 g total fat; 14 g saturated fat; 15 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 47 g carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 26 g sugar; 379 mg phosphorus; 103 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 165 mg sodium; 829 mg potassium; 2 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 125 mg cholesterol

Tip: The beef also makes great sandwiches.


RELATED: 1200 Calorie Diet - A Comprehensive Guide With Yummy Meal Plans


8. Grilled Pork Chops

A quick and easy grill recipe for a summer evening. You could make a little extra of the marinade and put it on zucchini slices to grill as a side dish.

2 tablespoons (30 ml) honey
1/4 cup (60 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) black pepper
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) garlic powder
4 boneless pork loin chops

In a shallow glass dish or bowl, mix together honey, Worcestershire sauce, pepper, and garlic powder. Add pork chops and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for no more than 4 hours. Lightly oil grill and preheat to medium. Remove pork chops from marinade. Grill 20 to 30 minutes, or until cooked through, turning often.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 174 calories (22% from fat, 50% from protein, 27% from carbohydrate); 22 g protein; 4 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 12 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 9 g sugar; 238 mg phosphorus; 14 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 199 mg sodium; 503 mg potassium; 24 IU vitamin A; 2 mg ATE vitamin E; 28 mg vitamin C; 64 mg cholesterol; 80 g water


9. Tuna Steaks

If you get them on sale, tuna steaks are a good bargain, as well as containing lots of omega-3 fatty acids. The key to cooking them is not to overcook them and dry them out. It’s fine for them to be medium or even medium-rare. Soaking them in a simple marinade also helps to keep them moist and flavorful.

2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
6 ounces (170 g) tuna steaks
1/2 teaspoon (1 g) freshly ground black pepper

Combine the olive oil and lemon juice. Marinate the steaks in the mixture for at least 30 minutes, turning occasionally. Heat a skillet over high heat. Add the steaks and cook 2 minutes. Sprinkle with pepper, turn over, and cook 2 minutes longer.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 247 calories (65% from fat, 32% from protein, 3% from carbohydrate); 20 g protein; 18 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 11 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 2 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 218 mg phosphorus; 10 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 34 mg sodium; 240 mg potassium; 1861 IU vitamin A; 557 mg ATE vitamin E; 7 mg vitamin C; 32 mg cholesterol; 72 g water


10. Grilled Tuna with Honey Mustard Marinade

These tuna steaks can be grilled or broiled. If it’s not good weather for outdoor grilling, they also work well on a contact grill like the George Foreman models.

1/3 cup (80 ml) red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon (15 g) spicy brown mustard
1 tablespoon (15 ml) honey
3 tablespoons (45 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound (455 g) tuna steaks

Combine the vinegar, mustard, honey, and olive oil in a jar or covered container; shake to mix well. Put tuna in a resealable plastic bag; add the mustard mixture. Seal the bag and let marinate for about 20 minutes. Heat the grill. Remove the tuna from the marinade and pour the marinade in a small saucepan. Bring marinade to a boil; remove from heat and set aside. Grill the tuna over high heat for about 2 minutes on each side, or to desired doneness. Drizzle with the hot marinade.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 275 calories (53% from fat, 40% from protein, 7% from carbohydrate); 27 g protein; 16 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 9 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 5 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 294 mg phosphorus; 13 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 89 mg sodium; 302 mg potassium; 2478 IU vitamin A; 743 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 43 mg cholesterol; 100 g water


11. Poached Salmon

Poaching fish is a healthy way to cook it, as well as making sure it stays moist and adding a little extra flavor.

4 cups (946 ml) water
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
1/4 cup (30 g) carrot, thinly sliced
1/2 cup (80 g) onion, thinly sliced
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon (4 g) fresh dill, chopped
1/2 pound (225 g) salmon fillets

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Combine all ingredients except salmon in a saucepan and heat to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Place salmon in a glass baking dish large enough to hold salmon in a single layer; pour poaching liquid over. Cover and bake for 20 minutes, or until salmon flakes easily.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 238 calories (47% from fat, 40% from protein, 13% from carbohydrate); 24 g protein; 12 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 7 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 291 mg phosphorus; 71 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 97 mg sodium; 595 mg potassium; 2841 IU vitamin A; 17 mg ATE vitamin E; 16 mg vitamin C; 67 mg cholesterol; 614 g water



12. Grilled Salmon and Vegetables

On hot days, it’s sometimes a good idea to not use the stove at all. This recipe gives you protein, vegetables, and starch in one easy grilled packet.

1 cup (195 g) instant rice, uncooked
1 cup (235 ml) low sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup (56 g) zucchini, sliced
1/2 cup (60 g) carrot, shredded
1/2 pound (225 g) salmon fillets
1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) black pepper
1/2 lemon, sliced

Heat grill to medium. Spray two large pieces of heavy-duty aluminum foil with nonstick vegetable oil spray. In a small bowl, mix together rice and broth. Let stand for 5 minutes, or until most of broth is absorbed. Stir in zucchini and carrots, and set aside. Place a salmon fillet in the center of each piece of foil. Sprinkle with pepper and place lemon slices on top. Place rice mixture around each fillet. Fold up foil and bring edges together. Fold over several times to seal. Fold in ends, allowing some room for the rice to expand during cooking. Place on the grill and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, or until salmon is done.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 347 calories (35% from fat, 33% from protein, 32% from carbohydrate); 28 g protein; 14 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 5 g polyunsaturated fat; 28 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 369 mg phosphorus; 54 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 130 mg sodium; 765 mg potassium; 5502 IU vitamin A; 17 mg ATE vitamin E; 19 mg vitamin C; 67 mg cholesterol; 320 g water


13. Thyme Roasted Salmon

Simple in its preparation, with just three ingredients, this salmon doesn’t lack for flavor.

1 pound salmon fillets
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Spray a baking sheet with non-stick cooking spray. Place the fillets on the sheet. Sprinkle with thyme and pepper. Cook at 350°F until fish flakes easily, about 20 minutes.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 182 calories (55% from fat, 45% from protein, 1% from carb); 20 g protein ; 11 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 0 g carb; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 231 mg phosphorus; 17 mg calcium; 59 mg sodium; 362 mg potassium; 59 IU vitamin A; 15 mg ATE vitamin E; 4 mg vitamin C; 58 mg cholesterol


14. Lemon Baked Salmon



This method will give you a little more intense lemon flavor than most. You can use this same preparation for a number of kinds of fish.

1 lemon
1 pound (455 g) salmon fillets
1/4 cup (60 ml) lemon juice
2 tablespoons (6 g) dill
2 teaspoons (10 ml) olive oil

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Spray a 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33-cm) glass baking dish with nonstick vegetable oil spray. Slice lemon into 1/4-inch (0.6-cm) slices and place in bottom of pan. Lay fillets over slices. Combine lemon juice, dill, and oil and pour over fillets. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until fish flakes easily.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 213 calories (55% from fat, 38% from protein, 7% from carbohydrate); 20 g protein; 13 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 4 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 242 mg phosphorus; 44 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 62 mg sodium; 449 mg potassium; 146 IU vitamin A; 15 mg ATE vitamin E; 19 mg vitamin C; 58 mg cholesterol; 95 g water


15. Greek Islands Fish

The flavor of this fish will whisk you away to a Mediterranean island. Serve with couscous.

6 tilapia fillets
1 cup no salt added tomatoes, diced
1/2 cup artichoke hearts, chopped
1/2 cup ripe olives, chopped
1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled

Place fillets in a 9 × 13-inch baking pan coated with non-stick cooking spray. Top with remaining ingredients. Bake at 400°F for 15 to 20 minutes or until fish flakes easily.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 274 calories (53% from fat, 40% from protein, 6% from carb); 27 g protein ; 16 g total fat; 5 g saturated fat; 7 g monounsaturated fat; 3 g polyunsaturated fat; 4 g carb; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 380 mg phosphorus; 101 mg calcium; 333 mg sodium; 612 mg potassium; 253 IU vitamin A; 39 mg ATE vitamin E; 7 mg vitamin C; 86 mg cholesterol


16. Baked Swordfish with Vegetables

This is a fairly simple recipe, with the flavor coming from the vegetables. It’s good with pasta or plain brown rice.

4 ounces (115 g) mushrooms, sliced
1 cup (160 g) onion, sliced
2 tablespoons (19 g) green bell pepper, chopped
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon (0.3 g) dried dill
1 pound (455 g) swordfish steaks
4 small bay leaves
2 tomatoes, sliced

Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). In a bowl, combine mushrooms, onions, green bell pepper, lemon juice, and dill. Line a shallow baking pan with foil. Spread vegetable mixture in bottom then arrange swordfish steaks on top. Place a bay leaf and 2 tomato slices on each swordfish steak. Cover pan with foil and bake for 45 to 55 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 165 calories (26% from fat, 59% from protein, 15% from carbohydrate); 24 g protein; 5 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 6 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 339 mg phosphorus; 18 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 126 mg sodium; 529 mg potassium; 168 IU vitamin A; 41 mg ATE vitamin E; 12 mg vitamin C; 44 mg cholesterol; 159 g water


17. Herbed Fish

Simple baked fish made flavorful by a combination of herbs and spices.

2 pounds (905 g) perch, or other firm white fish
1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon (0.3 g) dried marjoram
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried thyme
1/8 teaspoon (0.3 g) white pepper
2 bay leaves
1/2 cup (80 g) onion, chopped
1/2 cup (120 ml) white wine

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Wash fish, pat dry, and place in 9 × 13-inch (23 × 33-cm) dish. Combine oil with garlic powder, marjoram, thyme, and white pepper. Drizzle over fish. Top with bay leaves and onion. Pour wine over all. Bake, uncovered, for 20 to 30 minutes, or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 277 calories (26% from fat, 69% from protein, 5% from carbohydrate); 43 g protein; 7 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 3 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 503 mg phosphorus; 253 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 173 mg sodium; 675 mg potassium; 100 IU vitamin A; 27 mg ATE vitamin E; 3 mg vitamin C; 95 mg cholesterol; 222 g water


18. Grilled Stuffed Portobellos

I discovered portobello mushrooms not too long ago. We like them grilled on a bun, but these Mediterranean-flavored ones are better served with pasta or rice.

2/3 cup (120 g) plum tomato, chopped
2 ounces (55 g) part-skim mozzarella, shredded
1 teaspoon (5 ml) olive oil, divided
1/2 teaspoon (0.4 g) fresh rosemary
1/8 teaspoon (0.3 g) coarsely ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) crushed garlic
4 portobello mushroom caps, about 4 to 5 inches (10 to 12.5 cm) each
2 tablespoons (30 ml) lemon juice
2 teaspoons (2.6 g) fresh parsley

Prepare grill. Combine the tomato, cheese, 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) oil, rosemary, pepper, and garlic in a small bowl. Remove brown gills from the undersides of mushroom caps using a spoon, and discard. Remove stems; discard. Combine remaining 1/2 teaspoon oil (2.5 ml) and lemon juice in a small bowl. Brush over both sides of mushroom caps. Place the mushroom caps, stem sides down, on grill rack sprayed with nonstick vegetable oil spray, and grill for 5 minutes on each side or until soft. Spoon one-quarter of the tomato mixture into each mushroom cap. Cover and grill 3 minutes or until cheese is melted. Sprinkle with parsley.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 75 calories (40% from fat, 29% from protein, 32% from carbohydrate); 6 g protein; 4 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 1 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 6 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 181 mg phosphorus; 122 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 95 mg sodium; 490 mg potassium; 331 IU vitamin A; 18 mg ATE vitamin E; 8 mg vitamin C; 9 mg cholesterol; 115 g water


19. Caribbean Vegetable Curry

A moderately spicy vegetarian curry meal. Adjust the amount of cayenne to your taste.

1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
1 cup (160 g) thinly sliced onion
3/4 teaspoon crushed garlic
1 apple, peeled, cored, and chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon coriander
1/8 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 cup (25 g) sliced scallions
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 cup (37 g) chopped peanuts


Heat oil in skillet. Sauté onion, garlic, and apple until soft. Combine curry powder, lemon peel, ginger, coriander, turmeric, and cayenne pepper. Stir into onion mixture. Add black-eyed peas, undrained kidney beans, and raisins. Cover; simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in yogurt. Place egg halves on rice. Spoon curry over. Top with radishes, scallions, cilantro, and peanuts.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 218 g water; 524 calories (12% from fat, 22% from protein, 66% from carb); 29 g protein; 7 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 89 g carbohydrate; 22 g fiber; 16 g sugar; 513 mg phosphorus; 238 mg calcium; 9 mg iron; 119 mg sodium; 1465 mg potassium; 495 IU vitamin A; 40 mg vitamin E; 13 mg vitamin C; 119 mg cholesterol


20. Zucchini Frittata

During the summer when the garden is producing I’m often looking for uses for zucchini, and this one is popular.

2 cups (250 g) shredded zucchini
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
1/2 cup (35 g) mushrooms, sliced
4 eggs, beaten
1/3 cup (37 g) Swiss cheese, shredded

Place the zucchini in a paper towel and squeeze out any excess moisture. Heat oil in a 10-inch (25-cm) skillet. Sauté the mushrooms briefly, then add the zucchini. Cook for 4 minutes, or until the squash is barely tender. Pour eggs over vegetables. Stir once quickly to coat vegetables. Cook over low heat until eggs begin to set. Sprinkle with the cheese. Place under the broiler until cheese browns. Let set for 2 to 3 minutes. Cut into wedges and serve.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 144 calories (59% from fat, 32% from protein, 9% from carbohydrate); 12 g protein; 10 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 6 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 3 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 174 mg phosphorus; 149 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 146 mg sodium; 310 mg potassium; 367 IU vitamin A; 4 mg ATE vitamin E; 11 mg vitamin C; 214 mg cholesterol; 125 g water


21. Ricotta Omelet

This makes a nice summer dinner, with a salad and bread. You could also add some vegetables if you like.

4 eggs
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon (0.5 g) black pepper
1/2 cup (125 g) low fat ricotta cheese
2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil

Beat the eggs with the garlic powder, pepper, and ricotta. Heat the oil in a skillet or omelet pan. Add the egg mixture, and swirl to distribute evenly. Cook until nearly set, lifting edge to allow uncooked egg to run underneath. Fold over, cover, and cook until done.

Yield: 2 servings

Per serving: 311 calories (66% from fat, 29% from protein, 6% from carbohydrate); 22 g protein; 23 g total fat; 6 g saturated fat; 12 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 4 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 266 mg phosphorus; 235 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 299 mg sodium; 398 mg potassium; 689 IU vitamin A; 65 mg ATE vitamin E; 0 mg vitamin C; 440 mg cholesterol; 150 g water


22. Chicken Corn Chowder

A good soup for a cool fall day. Add bread and you have a meal.

6 potatoes, peeled and diced
1 1/2 cups (195 g) sliced carrot
1 cup (160 g) chopped onion
4 cups (950 ml) low-sodium chicken broth
12 ounces (340 g) frozen corn
2 cups (280 g) cooked, diced chicken
1 cup (235 ml) skim milk
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup (225 g) instant mashed potatoes

Cook potatoes, carrot, and onion in broth until soft. Add corn and chicken. Cook 5 minutes longer. Add milk, garlic powder, pepper, and mashed potatoes. Stir until potatoes are dissolved. Heat through.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 548 g water; 498 calories (10% from fat, 21% from protein, 69% from carb); 27 g protein; 6 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 89 g carbohydrate; 9 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 391 mg phosphorus; 117 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 169 mg sodium; 1716 mg potassium; 5617 IU vitamin A; 32 mg vitamin E; 39 mg vitamin C; 42 mg cholesterol


RELATED: Healthy Soup Recipes for Weight Loss


23. Italian Chicken Soup

One more cook-ahead meal for your slow cooker. This one is good either as a full meal or just to have on hand for lunches.

1 pound (455 g) boneless chicken breasts, cubed
4 cups (950 ml) low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups (480 g) low-sodium tomatoes
4 ounces (115 g) mushrooms, sliced
1/2 cup (65 g) sliced carrot
1/2 cup (56 g) sliced zucchini
1/2 cup (62 g) frozen green beans
6 ounces (170 g) frozen spinach
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon basil
1/2 teaspoon oregano

Combine ingredients and place in slow cooker. Cover and cook on low 8 to 10 hours or on high 4 to 5 hours.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 305 g water; 78 calories (17% from fat, 40% from protein, 43% from carb); 9 g protein; 2 g total fat; 0 g saturated fat; 1 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 10 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 133 mg phosphorus; 73 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 101 mg sodium; 568 mg potassium; 5706 IU vitamin A; 1 mg vitamin E; 23 mg vitamin C; 7 mg cholesterol


24. Beef Mushroom Soup with Barley

We have several recipes for beef vegetable soup that we make regularly, but this one is definitely a favorite. It just seems to be the kind of thing you want on a cold day.

1 pound (455 g) beef round steak, coarsely chopped
1 cup (160 g) onion, chopped
1 1/2 cups (105 g) mushrooms, sliced
2 cups (470 ml) reduced sodium beef broth
4 cups (946 ml) water
1 cup (200 g) pearl barley
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) garlic powder
2 teaspoons (10 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried thyme
1 cup (130 g) carrots, shredded
1/2 cup (60 g) celery, sliced
1/2 teaspoon (1 g) black pepper

Brown beef and onion. When beef is almost done add mushrooms and cook a few minutes more. Transfer to a slow cooker, add remaining ingredients, and cook on low for 8 to 10 hours.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 306 calories (14% from fat, 47% from protein, 39% from carbohydrate); 36 g protein; 5 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 30 g carbohydrate; 7 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 309 mg phosphorus; 43 mg calcium; 4 mg iron; 176 mg sodium; 699 mg potassium; 3637 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 8 mg vitamin C; 68 mg cholesterol; 348 g water


25. Beef Vegetable Soup

This is a pretty classic beef vegetable soup, the kind that country mothers have been making for years (except they probably didn’t use the slow cooker).

1 1/2 pounds (680 g) round steak, cut in 1/2-inch (1.3-cm) pieces
1 cup (160 g) onion, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup (50 g) celery, sliced
4 potatoes, cubed
4 cups (946 ml) reduced sodium beef broth
1 cup (70 g) cabbage, coarsely chopped
4 cups (750 g) frozen mixed vegetables, thawed
2 cups (360 g) canned no-salt-added tomatoes

Brown meat in a skillet and transfer to slow cooker. Add onion, celery, and potatoes. Pour broth over. Cook on low for 8 to 10 hours. Add cabbage, mixed vegetables, and tomatoes. Turn to high and cook for 30 minutes to 1 hour, or until vegetables are done.

Yield: 8 servings

Per serving: 373 calories (10% from fat, 39% from protein, 51% from carbohydrate); 37 g protein; 4 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 48 g carbohydrate; 8 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 367 mg phosphorus; 85 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 446 mg sodium; 1525 mg potassium; 4015 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 31 mg vitamin C; 49 mg cholesterol; 486 g water


26. Cincinnati-Style Chili

Cincinnati, Ohio, claims to be where chili was created. Cincinnati-style chili is quite different from the more familiar Tex-Mex variety. The chili is thinner and contains an unusual blend of spices that includes cinnamon, chocolate or cocoa, allspice, and Worcestershire sauce. It’s usually served over spaghetti, although it’s good in a bowl by itself or as a hot dog topping.

1 cup (160 g) onion, chopped
1 pound (455 g) extra-lean ground beef (93% lean)
1/4 teaspoon (0.8 g) minced garlic
1 tablespoon (7.5 g) chili powder
1 teaspoon (1.9 g) ground allspice
1 teaspoon (2.3 g) cinnamon
1 teaspoon (2.5 g) cumin
1/2 teaspoon (0.9 g) cayenne pepper
1 1/2 tablespoons (8 g) unsweetened cocoa powder
16 ounces (455 g) no-salt-added tomato sauce
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon (15 ml) cider vinegar
1/2 cup (120 ml) water

In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, sauté onion, ground beef, garlic, and chili powder until ground beef is slightly cooked. Add remaining ingredients. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, 1 1/2 hours.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 227 calories (32% from fat, 41% from protein, 27% from carbohydrate); 16 g protein; 6 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 10 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 4 g sugar; 156 mg phosphorus; 38 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 98 mg sodium; 598 mg potassium; 688 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 17 mg vitamin C; 52 mg cholesterol; 158 g water

Tip: To serve the traditional Cincinnati way, ladle chili over cooked spaghetti and serve with toppings of your choice. Oyster crackers are served on the side. Cincinnati chili is ordered by number: Two, Three, Four, or Five Way.

Two-Way Chili: Chili served on spaghetti
Three-Way Chili: Additionally topped with shredded Cheddar cheese
Four-Way Chili: Additionally topped with chopped onions
Five-Way Chili: Additionally topped with kidney beans


27. Vegetable Pasta Sauce

Low in calories, fat free, 3 grams of fiber, and great Italian flavor on top of all that.

1 cup (160 g) finely chopped onion
1 teaspoon crushed garlic
2 teaspoons basil
1 1/2 teaspoons oregano
1 bay leaf
28 ounces (800 g) no-salt-added canned tomatoes
16 ounces (455 g) no-salt-added tomato sauce
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, fresh ground
4 tablespoons (16 g) chopped fresh parsley

In a large pot, heat onion, garlic, basil, oregano, bay leaf, tomatoes, tomato sauce, pepper, and parsley. Mix well, mashing tomatoes with a fork. Bring to boiling, reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally for 1 1/2 hours. Remove bay leaf. Serve over whole wheat pasta.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 218 g water; 64 calories (5% from fat, 14% from protein, 81% from carb); 2 g protein; 0 g total fat; 0 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 14 g carbohydrate; 3 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 61 mg phosphorus; 71 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 28 mg sodium; 597 mg potassium; 668 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 28 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol


28. Tuna Alfredo Sauce

If you’re looking for something a little different to put over pasta, this could be just the thing.

2 tablespoons (28 g) butter
4 ounces (115 g) mushrooms, sliced
2 tablespoons (16 g) flour
1 cup (235 ml) skim milk
1 can (6-ounce, or 170-g) tuna
2 tablespoons (10 g) Parmesan cheese, grated

Melt butter in a saucepan and sauté mushrooms. Stir in flour, then slowly add milk and tuna, cooking and stirring until thickened and bubbly. Remove from heat and stir in cheese.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 114 calories (20% from fat, 54% from protein, 27% from carbohydrate); 15 g protein; 2 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 0 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 7 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 214 mg phosphorus; 130 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 107 mg sodium; 312 mg potassium; 147 IU vitamin A; 44 mg ATE vitamin E; 1 mg vitamin C; 32 mg cholesterol; 114 g water


29. Szechuan Chicken


Szechuan Chicken


A spicy Szechuan dish made with diced chicken, peanuts, and chile peppers.

For Marinade:

1 1/2 tablespoons (22 ml) water
1 tablespoon (15 ml) Dick’s Reduced Sodium Soy Sauce (see recipe page 25)
1 1/2 tablespoons (12 g) cornstarch
1 tablespoon (15 ml) rice wine

For Chicken:

1 pound (455 g) boneless chicken breasts
2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil
8 dried chile peppers
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) minced garlic
1/2 cup (75 g) green bell pepper, cut in 1/2-inch (1.3-cm) pieces
1/2 cup (75 g) dry-roasted peanuts

For Sauce:

2 tablespoons (30 ml) Dick’s Reduced Sodium Soy Sauce (see recipe page 25)
1 tablespoon (15 ml) sherry
1 tablespoon (13 g) sugar
1 teaspoon (3 g) cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon (1 ml) sesame oil

To make the marinade: Mix together marinade ingredients.

To make the chicken: Marinate chicken for at least 20 minutes. Heat wok. When hot, add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) oil. When oil is hot, add dried chile peppers and garlic and stir-fry until brown and fragrant. Add the green pepper cubes. After approximately two minutes, push the peppers up the side of the wok and add the chicken cubes in the middle of the wok. Stir-fry until the chicken cubes are thoroughly cooked.

To make the sauce: Combine sauce ingredients and add into the wok. Stir until thickened. Add peanuts just before removing the chicken mixture from the wok.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 288 calories (17% from fat, 22% from protein, 61% from carbohydrate); 31 g protein; 11 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat; 5 g polyunsaturated fat; 87 g carbohydrate; 2 g fiber; 7 g sugar; 304 mg phosphorus; 32 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 156 mg sodium; 499 mg potassium; 383 IU vitamin A; 7 mg ATE vitamin E; 17 mg vitamin C; 66 mg cholesterol; 129 g water


30. Carne Asada

Most recipes call for skirt or flank steak for this, but any cut of beef will do. The London broil, or round steak, is relatively inexpensive and low in fat.

2 pounds (905 g) beef round steak
1/4 cup (60 ml) lime juice
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) minced garlic
2 tablespoons (5.3 g) Mexican seasoning

Place steak in resealable plastic bag with lime juice and garlic. Marinate 2 hours, turning occasionally. Remove from marinade; rub 1 tablespoon (2.6 g) of Mexican seasoning on each side. Grill over medium heat until desired doneness. Slice thinly to serve.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 304 calories (23% from fat, 75% from protein, 1% from carbohydrate); 55 g protein; 8 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat; 0 g polyunsaturated fat; 1 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 343 mg phosphorus; 8 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 68 mg sodium; 518 mg potassium; 5 IU vitamin A; 0 mg ATE vitamin E; 3 mg vitamin C; 136 mg cholesterol; 98 g water


31. Low Fat Carnitas

Carnitas is crispy spiced pork that can be used for tacos, burritos, tostadas, or sandwiches.

2 pounds (905 g) pork loin
1/2 cup (80 g) onion, sliced
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) minced garlic
1/2 teaspoon (0.5 g) dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon (1.3 g) cumin
1/2 teaspoon (1.5 g) garlic powder

In a 3-quart (2.8-L) saucepan combine pork, onion, garlic, oregano, and cumin; add enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 2 hours. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C, or gas mark 4). Drain meat and place in a baking pan. Sprinkle meat with garlic powder. Bake for 45 minutes. Remove from oven. While meat is still warm, use forks to shred meat.

Yield: 8 servings

Per serving: 151 calories (30% from fat, 67% from protein, 3% from carbohydrate); 24 g protein; 5 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 1 g polyunsaturated fat; 1 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 252 mg phosphorus; 20 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 59 mg sodium; 440 mg potassium; 14 IU vitamin A; 2 mg ATE vitamin E; 2 mg vitamin C; 71 mg cholesterol; 92 g water


32. Broccoli and Tomato Salad

As pretty as it is tasty, this salad is great with a piece of grilled meat or an egg dish like quiche.

1 pound (455 g) broccoli
1/4 pound (115 g) mushrooms
3/4 cup (75 g) olives, drained
8 ounces (225 g) cherry tomatoes

Dressing

1/3 cup (80 ml) olive oil
1 tablespoon (15 ml) white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon (15 ml) lemon juice
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup (25 g) minced scallions
1/4 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon black pepper, fresh ground

Trim florets from broccoli, you should have about 1 quart (1 L). Reserve stems for another use. Drop broccoli florets into boiling water for 1 minute or just until they turn bright green; drain. Trim mushroom stems to 1/2 inch (1 cm). Combine broccoli, mushrooms, olives, and cherry tomatoes in bowl. Measure oil, vinegar, lemon juice, parsley, scallions, garlic, and pepper into small bowl. Whisk until blended. Pour dressing over vegetable mixture. Turn gently to coat vegetables. Cover and refrigerate 3 hours or more until ready to serve.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 162 g water; 249 calories (72% from fat, 7% from protein, 20% from carb); 5 g protein; 21 g total fat; 3 g saturated fat; 15 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 13 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 3 g sugar; 104 mg phosphorus; 88 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 261 mg sodium; 603 mg potassium; 1351 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 117 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol

Tip: This is a colorful salad to serve in a glass bowl.


33. Broccoli Cauliflower Salad

Broccoli Cauliflower Salad


Simple salad that is good with grilled meat or any of a number of other meals.

1 pound (455 g) broccoli, cut in florets
1 pound (455 g) cauliflower, cut in florets
1 cup (160 g) thinly sliced red onion
1/2 cup (115 g) mayonnaise
1/4 cup (60 ml) vinegar
1/4 cup (50 g) sugar
1/4 cup (60 ml) salad oil
3 tablespoons (45 ml) mustard

Mix broccoli and cauliflower florets. Add onion and combine other ingredients. Pour over vegetables. Refrigerate 2 hours before serving.

Yield: 6 servings

Per serving: 174 g water; 307 calories (69% from fat, 6% from protein, 25% from carb); 4 g protein; 24 g total fat; 4 g saturated fat; 10 g monounsaturated fat; 9 g polyunsaturated fat; 20 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 13 g sugar; 88 mg phosphorus; 63 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 143 mg sodium; 413 mg potassium; 538 IU vitamin A; 15 mg vitamin E; 103 mg vitamin C; 7 mg cholesterol


34. Corn Salad

Corn Salad - Easy Heart Healthy Recipes


Slightly sweet from the apple and very crunchy, this salad is great with barbecued meats.

1 cup (150 g) diced green bell pepper
1 avocado, cubed
1 cup (150 g) chopped apple
2 cups (328 g) corn, cooked and cooled
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon (15 ml) red wine vinegar
3 tablespoons (45 ml) olive oil

Place pepper, avocado, apple, and corn in salad bowl. Stir to mix. Combine remaining ingredients and pour over salad, tossing lightly.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 151 g water; 234 calories (56% from fat, 5% from protein, 38% from carb); 3 g protein; 16 g total fat; 2 g saturated fat; 11 g monounsaturated fat; 2 g polyunsaturated fat; 24 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 77 mg phosphorus; 14 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 23 mg sodium; 386 mg potassium; 201 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 37 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol

Tip: For a Mexican salad, omit the apple and add a teaspoon of ground cumin to the dressing.


RELATED: Cucumber Salad Recipes


35. Marinated Zucchini Salad

This is a nice summer salad that can help to use up those extra zucchini when the garden is producing more than you can eat.

2 cups (220 g) thinly sliced zucchini
1/2 cup (35 g) thinly sliced mushrooms
1 cup (300 g) artichoke hearts, drained and sliced
1 can bamboo shoots, drained
1/2 cup (120 ml) Italian dressing

Mix all but dressing together in a large bowl. Pour dressing over ingredients and stir to mix. Marinate several hours or overnight.

Yield: 4 servings

Per serving: 181 g water; 129 calories (57% from fat, 10% from protein, 32% from carb); 4 g protein; 9 g total fat; 1 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat; 4 g polyunsaturated fat; 11 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 76 mg phosphorus; 26 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 520 mg sodium; 368 mg potassium; 212 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin E; 14 mg vitamin C; 0 mg cholesterol

35 Easy Heart Healthy Recipes