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Showing posts with label low carb. Show all posts
Showing posts with label low carb. Show all posts
The amount of diets that can be chosen today by those who want to lose weight is growing steadily. Not only well-known concepts such as FHD or Low Fat determine the events here, but also newer methods. Low carb, the most extensive renunciation of carbohydrates, is one of the more modern variants and is hyped by many women and men downright. That the concept seems to work is obvious. But what is important if carbohydrates should no longer play a big role in the future?

Lose Weight With Low-carb - Exciting Possibilities in The Kitchen



WHAT IS LOW-CARB?

The low-carb diet, as it is known today, is considered a descendant of the classic Atkins diet. Atkins, with forty percent protein and 45 percent fat in the daily diet, was much stricter and slower, allowing low-carb to relax. This makes this form of nutrition more popular, because the conversion is not only easier at first glance and varied and nutrient-rich food planning are possible. This gave the low-carb diet in the context of a German survey from 2013 quite good values. Here, around four percent of all respondents favored low-carb. Just as many appreciated famous alternatives such as fasting or calorie counting. Systems such as Weight Watchers were only marginally more popular at just under six percent.

But how does the low-carb procedure work? Basically, the reduction of carbohydrate intake plays a significant role here. The body is accustomed to extracting energy from carbohydrates and converting possible surpluses into flab. Anyone who deprives him of the carbohydrates as the basis for energy production, sets in motion a restructuring. Then the body begins to gain its energy from proteins and fats, which stimulates the removal of unwanted cushions. The advantage for many: starvation and low carb do not belong together, because there are good alternatives that fill the plate neatly several times a day.

The basic principle of the low-carb diet uses - like many other diets too - the percentage participation of the three macronutrients. These should be broken down as follows:

  • Fat content: 50 to 60 percent
  • Protein content: 35 percent
  • Carbohydrate content: 15 to 30 percent (maximum 100 to 120 grams daily)

Since percentage values ​​are initially confusing, people wanting to lose weight should know their daily calorie needs. This then enables the calculation of actual values. It helps to know that one gram of protein and carbohydrates each provide about 4.1 calories. One gram of fat, however, accounts for 9.3 calories. As additional help to get a common thread, additional recommendations apply. Thus, the amount of carbohydrates in a low-carb diet should be a maximum of 100 to 120 grams per day, while one to two grams of protein per kilogram of body weight are considered useful. The rest of the diet is then fat.

RELATED: Low Carb Diets - Carb Concepts


FAT IN LOW CARB DIET: PLEASE HIGH QUALITY!

The fact is: Even in the low-carb diet, of course, fat is not the same fat. Probably the most important distinction that men and women should know is that between saturated, unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Basically, fat in the diet is actually not an unhealthy ingredient, but can quickly become one.

For then, if the fat sources are inferior and above all provide unsaturated fatty acids, no real consumer success is possible. So if you think you can lose weight with lots of high-fat meat, butter, cream and fat chocolate, sooner or later you will fail. It is better to concentrate on unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and to keep the content of saturated fatty acids as low as possible.
Good oil provides valuable fatty acids.

FAT IN LOW CARB DIET - Olive Oil


Unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids usually originate from plants, seeds and nuts. Integrating healthy fat into your daily diet is easier with high-quality oils. Using good oils such as olive oil, linseed oil, thistle oil or even grapeseed oil is a clever move, because every oil has its own individual taste and scores high in its content of unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fandler supplies exact values ​​for each oil, which can be used by interested parties.

Anyone who takes care to use every oil according to their purpose increases the possibilities in their own kitchen immensely. So oils such as rapeseed oil, coconut oil or olive oil are good for searing low-fat meat, fish or vegetables. However, variants such as linseed, pumpkin seed or thistle oil do not tolerate the heat in pot and pan. They should therefore be used rather cold. However, as an addition to the morning cereal or in salad dressing, these oils can also be used perfectly without heat.

MEAL ALTERNATIVES HELPING CREATIVITY ON THE JUMP

Anyone who wants to feed on the low-carb principle, reaches a point at the latest after a few weeks, at the actually beloved food to start missing. To do without biscuits, cakes and even bread is not easy for every weight loss taker. White flour, however, is arguably the biggest enemy of any low-carbohydrate diet, and it does not score high on nutrients even off this diet. It is therefore generally advisable to banish light flour from the diet.

Low carb baking is possible with a few flour alternatives


Low carb baking is possible with a few flour alternatives.

But wholemeal flour also has a fairly high proportion of carbohydrates. However, since it provides many nutrients and fiber, it may be used in the context of a low-carb diet quite a small extent. However, the small amount is not enough to bake something delicious and alternatives must come from. Since the market has long since recognized this, there are now some exciting flour varieties that can be used in baking and have comparatively few carbohydrates.

Good examples for this are:
Flour variant                        Carbohydrates per 100 grams

Almond flour                          Four to seven grams
Coconut flour                         Nine to 15 grams
Chiamehl                                Zero grams
Soy flour                                Three to five grams


Each of these flours can then be used in baking bread, cakes or biscuits to complement the wholegrain flour. However, it is important to know how the individual flours behave. Almond flour and soy flour need a little more liquid, otherwise doughs will quickly become too firm. However, if you experiment a little and also add chopped nuts, grated coconut, cracked flax seeds or oatmeal (in small quantities) to the dough, you will quickly find your own secret recipe for low carbohydrate biscuits.

RELATED: Low Carb Desserts - Yogurt With Strawberries and Sunflower Seeds (low carb)

Lose Weight With Low-carb: Exciting Possibilities in The Kitchen

Yogurt with strawberries and sesame crunch (low carb)


Delicious low carb breakfast with strawberries and sunflower seeds. Good to prepare and in a glass with lid also good to take away to work.

Low Carb Desserts - Yogurt With Strawberries and Sunflower Seeds


Preparation:

1. Wash the strawberries, remove the green, cut them into small pieces and divide them into two glasses.
2. Mix yogurt with two tablespoons of xylitol and a pinch of vanilla and add to the strawberries.
3. Melt the coconut oil in a small pan, add 2 tablespoons of xylitol and sunflower seeds and fry over medium heat until the sesame is golden yellow.
4. Pour the toasted sunflower seeds over the yoghurt and enjoy.

Ingredients:

  • 180 g yoghurt (Greek)
  • 150 g strawberries
  • 4 tbsp xylitol (e.g. Xucker Premium)
  • 2 tbsp sunflower seeds
  • 1 tsp coconut oil (native)
  • 1 pinch vanilla (ground)

Nutritional Values:
  • Carbohydrates 5 g
  • Protein 4 g
  • Fat 9 g

Low Carb Desserts - Yogurt With Strawberries and Sunflower Seeds (low carb)

Foods that are low in simple carbs and high in fibers provide a variety of benefits, especially if you are concerned about blood sugar, weight loss, and carbohydrate intake. Fiber offsets the impact of sugary foods and prevents blood sugar spikes. It also helps you feel fuller longer and improves digestion. Though most people think of fiber supplements and bran flakes when it comes to boosting fiber intake, there are actually many whole foods that are high in fiber and low in carbohydrates.

10 Low Carb High Fiber Foods


Avocado

Medium avocado contains 11 grams of fiber, which is nearly half of the daily recommended intake. It also contains unsaturated fatty acids, which is the "good" fat. Avocados are packed with vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. Avocados can be added to salads, sliced on sandwiches, or mashed with tomatoes, onions, and spices for guacamole.

Blackberries

Blackberries Raspberries Blueberries


Blackberries contain eight grams of fiber and are packed with health benefits that help reduce a person's risk for disease.

Raspberries

Similar to blackberries, raspberries are also packed with vitamins, minerals, and other health qualities. They contain eight grams of fiber and are high in vitamin C and antioxidants. They are also one of the best anti-inflammatory foods available.

Black Beans

A half-cup of black beans contain seven grams of fiber. They are very filling and make a great addition to soups, salads, dips, and casseroles.

Lentils

Lentils are an excellent substitute for meat because they are packed with protein. They can also be added to salads and soups. A cup of lentils contain eight grams of fiber and help lower cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

Vegetable Soup

Fresh vegetable soup allows you to create an entire meal packed with fiber. Traditional vegetable soup features carrots, potatoes, celery, tomatoes, and green beans. For an even healthier option, exchange potatoes for lentils or beans, and toss in an even wider variety of veggies including broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, kale, and okra.


RELATED: Healthy Soup Recipes for Weight Loss



Broccoli

Broccoli


Many vegetables are packed with fiber and broccoli is no exception. A cup of broccoli contains six grams of fiber. It is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, which are widely accepted as superfoods because of their anti-cancer benefits.

Pears

Fruits are sometimes high in sugar, so it is important to eat fruit in moderation and avoid fruits that are highest in sugar. Pears are a great alternative to some high sugar fruits and contains nearly five grams of fiber when the skin is consumed.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal


Oatmeal contains only four grams of fiber, but it is soluble fiber. This type of fiber is what gives oatmeal its gummy, sticky consistency. It helps you feel fuller for a longer period of time and improves cholesterol levels. Choose steel cut oats and old-fashioned rolled oats for the biggest health benefits. Pre-cooked oats, especially flavored options sold in individual serving packets, are packed with sugar and lack a number of health benefits found in unprocessed varieties.

Barley

Barley is the lowest-glycemic grain and contains three grams of soluble fiber. It is extremely filling and offers a great deal of blood sugar protection.


RELATED: Low Carb Diets - Carb Concepts


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7723741

10 Low Carb High Fiber Foods

Atkins and South Beach took low-carb diets from disparaged to celebrated, but some confusion remains. We clear the air.

Low Carb Diets - Carb Concepts



Low-carb diets have had their moment in the spotlight. Is their 15 minutes of fame up? That would be a shame. After all, tons of scientific studies and real-world evidence have shown us that controlling carbs is one of the best ways to manage your weight, keep your heart healthy and increase muscle mass. Many nutritionists, though, don’t agree. In the 1970s, the American Medical Association decried low-carb diets (which actually have been popular on and off since the 19th century) as dangerous, and demonized dietary fat as the cause of soaring obesity and heart-disease rates.

In a way, we understand their reasoning. Most of the misconceptions about carbs are based on some type of fact, albeit misinterpreted, misappropriated or just plain mangled. For instance, fat is more than twice as calorie-dense as protein or carbohydrates, containing 9 calories per gram compared to 4 for carbs and protein. Nutritionists used to see it as a simple numbers game, but that was before we understood just how healthy fats can be, how desperately the body needs them, and about the potentially damaging interplay between carbs and insulin within the body. Given all the misconceptions that arise in the mainstream media and our affinity for disseminating the truth about diet and nutrition, we figured we’d do some low-carb myth-busting. Read on to iron out any remaining confusion about following a low-carb lifestyle.

1) Myth: Going low-carb means you can never eat carbs ever. This is categorically false. A low-carb diet allows plenty of room for carbs, and M&F HERS encourages you to eat them. We recommend you consume about 1 gram of carbs per pound of bodyweight per day on workout days, dropping to 0.5 gram per pound of bodyweight on rest days. This means that a 140-pound woman can eat 140 grams of carbs on workout days. (To get an idea of just how much food that translates to, see the chart at right.)

The types of carbohydrates you eat and when you eat them are equally important. The majority of the carbs you consume should be slow-digesting, a category that includes foods such as brown rice, legumes, oatmeal, vegetables, whole-wheat bread and, to a certain degree, fruits. The only time we veer from this advice is in the postworkout window. The goal then is to provoke a massive wave of the anabolic hormone insulin to fuel muscle growth and recovery, and to do that you should eat fast-digesting carbs such as jelly, sports drinks, and white bread, potatoes and rice.

Here, then, is an example of what the carb portion of a typical workout day looks like on a low-carb diet:


example of what the carb portion of a typical workout day looks like on a low-carb diet



1 Since a 140-pound woman is technically allotted 140 grams of carbs, the remaining 15 grams come from other foods such as peanut butter and cottage cheese.


2) Myth: By not eating carbs, you’ll be hungry all the time. That’s also false. It? s true that carbs are the easiest source of energy and eating them increases serotonin levels, a reward system built by evolution to encourage consumption of foods that provide fast, ample energy. But once you adapt to a low-carb diet, your body won’t miss them.

Eating carbs may make you feel good, but they won’t keep you full for long. Fast-digesting carbs exit the stomach and are absorbed by the intestines quickly; the resulting insulin spike sends glucose to muscle cells, the liver or fat stores, then your body wants more. Protein and fat take longer to process, keeping your digestive system busy and you satiated longer.

Protein intake has been shown to reduce hunger by another method as well. A study conducted at University College London had subjects eat three meals: one high in protein, one high in carbs and one high in fat. Scientists found that subjects who consumed the high-protein meal were three times as satiated as after the high-carb meal and twice as satiated as after the high-fat meal. The cause? Peptide YY, a compound produced in the gut after protein consumption that tells the brain you’re full. Subjects eating the protein meal had significantly higher levels of peptide YY in their bloodstreams than the others. When low-carb dieters get a greater percentage of calories from protein, they actually experience less hunger than those eating a “normal” higher-carb diet.


RELATED: How to Make a High Protein Breakfast



3) Myth: You don’t have any energy on a low-carb diet.This myth persists because it contains a minuscule nugget of truth. Glucose is the easiest thing for the body to use as fuel, and all carbs are eventually broken down into glucose. So when you eat ample carbs, your body doesn’t have to work very hard to find fuel from other sources, namely fat. Remove or reduce the amount of glucose you provide your body and it’ll have to step up fat-burning, which means it must call on special enzymes that break down fat.

The problem is your body is an extremely efficient machine, and it’ll slow the production of hormones, enzymes or other compounds that it doesn’t currently require in large quantities. When you switch to a low-carb diet, your body may not have an adequate amount of fat-burning enzymes available to break down enough fat to supply all the energy it requires. The result? Sluggishness and lassitude at least until your body increases its production of fat-burning enzymes.

Ample evidence indicates that this low-energy state is temporary, however, lasting only until the body adapts. A review of research published in 2004 in the journal Nutrition & Metabolism states that not only have hunting cultures such as the Inuit survived for thousands of years on low-carb diets out of necessity but “submaximal endurance performance can be sustained despite the virtual exclusion of carbohydrate from the human diet” as well. This is supported by a study conducted by researchers at California State University, Fullerton, who examined the effects of a carb-restricted diet on 15-rep strength in a variety of exercises. They found that a low-carb diet had no effect on the amount of weight subjects could lift.

4) Myth: Get ready to gorge yourself on bacon and cheese. This was Atkins’ selling point, but it’s just not going to work over the long haul. While low-carb diets do allow for an increase in the number of calories you obtain from fats, your health and physique will be better off if those fats are healthy. You can occasionally indulge in bacon or full-fat cheese, but for the most part aim to eat healthy fat from sources such as avocados, grass-fed beef, olives or olive oil, peanut butter, tuna and wild salmon.

5) Myth: All those fatty foods you’re eating now will lead to heart disease.

We’ve all had the message that fatty foods increase our risk of cardiovascular disease drubbed into us, but research shows saturated fats don’t have as much of an effect on health when eaten in place of carbs.

low carb breakfast


A review of research published in the journal Nutrition & Metabolism in 2005 revealed that limiting carbs and replacing them with any type of fat — even the so-called “bad” saturated variety — resulted in both lower triglyceride levels and an

increase in “good” HDL cholesterol. In fact, saturated fat elevated HDL cholesterol more than unsaturated fat did. The review also found that the major type of sat fat in beef, chicken and pork doesn’t raise “bad” LDL cholesterol levels.


RELATED: Tips For Making Chicken and Bacon Salad
 

In case you’re still worried about eating red meat, other data support its safety. Researchers at the University of Western Australia School of Medicine (Perth) increased subjects’ red-meat consumption for eight weeks and compared their markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, two signals of heart disease, to those who maintained their normal diets. No difference was seen in the markers but subjects who ate more red meat had lower levels of C-reactive protein, a powerful inflammatory factor that’s closely linked to heart disease. It appears, then, that replacing at least some carb calories with fat can make you healthier.


6) Myth: Following a low-carbohydrate diet will cause you to lose muscle. This myth has traceable roots as well, though they’ve been twisted by misconception. When you first begin a low-carb diet, you’ll lose a little of the water stored in muscle tissue, making your muscles look slightly less full. This is because fewer dietary carbs are circulating and the fat-burning pathway isn’t yet fully operational, so your body will use the glycogen stored in muscles as fuel. Glycogen normally pulls water into muscle cells, so with reduced glycogen levels, you also get reduced water levels. As your system adapts, however, it’ll restore glycogen levels and your muscle volume will return to its previous state. At no time will you lose actual muscle tissue; in fact, following a low-carb diet will help boost muscle growth while you get lean, primarily because


you’re taking in more protein, which spurs protein synthesis and burns more fat for fuel.

A study published in a 2002 issue of the journalMetabolism showed the power of a low-carb diet and its effects on body composition. Scientists at the University of Connecticut (Storrs) had 12 men switch to a very low-carb diet. At the end of six weeks, subjects had experienced significant decreases in bodyfat and an increase in lean body mass, despite the fact they hadn’t trained. You read that right: Eating a low-carb diet can actually increase muscle mass even if weightlifting isn’t involved.

7) Myth: Low-carb diets are a short-term solution. Here’s the bottom line: If you follow our dietary advice, you’re most likely already on a relatively lower-carb diet. It’s very difficult to eat clean and improve your physique while still consuming massive amounts of chips and cookies. Those of you who eat clean and love to train already know this way of eating isn’t a quick fix, it’s a lifestyle. Once you commit to it, you’ll experience all the benefits we’ve discussed: healthier arteries, increased strength and muscle mass, and a leaner physique. And that’s no myth.

Low Carb Lunch



Low-Carb, Corrected Diet

 


Low Carb Diets - Carb Concepts

Are you tired of trying different weight loss methods without any substantial or long-term success?

Are you looking to begin the process of building a happier, healthier lifestyle for yourself that you can be proud of?

Drop 10 Pounds Without Eating Less Or Working Out


Or, maybe you just want to be able to be able to feel great about yourself when you're around others. If it's one thing that matters the most in life, it's being able to enjoy quality moments with the people that matter most.

If these things sound like something you're interested in, then get ready to explore one of the most proven, trusted, and reliable methods of losing weight, and feeling great.

The low carb diet has been heavily endorsed as being one of the most effective solutions for improved health and weight loss for decades. Over the years, many diet fads have come and gone, yet the low carb diet remains a top option for many.

As the name suggests, the low carb diet is simply an alternative method of eating that requires you to cut back on consuming refined sugars and carbs. There are several different variations of the standard low carb diet, however the most common and effective among them is a low carb, high-fat diet (good fats of course!).

Lose Weight and Keep It Off

By cutting back on refined sugars and carbohydrates, you will also be cutting back on processed foods and junk food. You will be basing your meals around healthy, whole ingredients. This alone will help you lose weight, but when combined with the other benefits already discussed, you will likely have no problem reaching your ideal weight.

For decades, people have used low carb dieting to promote weight loss and increase their metabolism. This is a sustainable diet that you can continue to follow for the rest of your life! You can enjoy a healthy life simply by changing the way that you eat.

RELATED: How I Lost Weight and Managed to Keep It Off


You Do Not Need to Starve Yourself

A great reason to consider following the low carb diet is that you do not need to starve yourself. Many people are surprised by the amount of food that they get to eat on a low carb diet. On this diet, you will be eating a lot of protein, which is very filling and satisfying.

This will include three meals per day, along with one or two small snacks in-between. Regardless of your previous eating habits, it is highly unlikely that you will ever feel hungry or unsatisfied while on this diet since you aren't eating less.

Basing Your Meals Around Protein

There is a lot more to the low carb diet than simply cutting back on your intake of carbohydrates. You also need to ensure that you are receiving enough protein to compensate for the loss of energy from carbs. Otherwise, you will be depriving yourself of nutrition, which is not a sustainable method of achieving weight loss.

The majority of your meals will be based around protein. This includes lean meats, eggs, some dairy products, and any other food that are low in carbs and high in protein or fiber. You will work with a base nutritional recommendation for your daily intake of protein and carbs.

Broccoli and Cheese Mini Omelet Low Carb Recipe

Here is a simple, fast, and easy low carb recipe you can make today for breakfast to get started. These mini omelets provide 18 grams of protein and 5 grams of carbs per serving of two omelets. You can prepare these in the evening and then have them for breakfast for the next several days as leftovers if you would like.




Ingredients

  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 cup egg whites
  • 4 cups of broccoli florets
  • ¼ cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • ¼ cup grated cheese of your choice
  • 1 teaspoon of olive oil
  • A dash of salt and pepper
  • Cooking spray or a small amount of butter

Directions

Start by preheating your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. While the oven is preheating, steam the broccoli florets in a small amount of water for about 6 to 7 minutes. Once removed and strained, they should crumble into smaller pieces. Add them along with the olive oil, salt, and pepper into a mixing bowl. Mix thoroughly.

Spray a cupcake or muffin tin with cooking spray or line with butter. Spread the broccoli mixture along the bottoms of the muffin cups. In a medium bowl, beat the egg whites and eggs together. Add the grated cheese of your choice. Pour this over the broccoli mixture, until the cup is about ¾ full.

Top the mini omelets with cheddar cheese and bake for about 20 minutes. The edges should be brown and the tops fluffy. You can serve immediately or store them for future meals.

RELATED: 5 Quick Tips to Lose Weight Fast Naturally in 10 Days

Broccoli and Cheese Mini Omelet Low Carb Recipe


Want to learn MORE about how you can begin to lose weight fast and easy?

Check out my latest book: 'Low Carb Diet For Beginners' available exclusively on Amazon!

In this book, I dive a lot deeper into the real mechanics of how this diet works, and how you can begin to understand why you currently aren't getting the results that you truly want.

You'll also receive multiple recipes, and an action plan that you can use everyday to propel yourself towards your weight loss goals.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andrew_Mills/2334436

Drop 10 Pounds Without Eating Less Or Working Out